Upper Canada: The Formative Years, 1784-1841

By Gerald M. Craig | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
Economic Growth in the 1820's and 1830's

In 1824 a young English aristocrat, who would one day serve as Colonial Secretary and later as Prime Minister, made a North American tour with three friends. In the privacy of a journal not published for over a century E. G. Stanley remarked upon the slow rate of Canadian economic growth as compared with that of the United States, noting "the universal energy and activity which pervades the latter, and the general supineness and listlessness in which the former appears to be sunk." In particular, he emphasized the long and narrow shape of the Canadas, with only one outlet to the sea, and that one frozen over for half the year.1 This type of remark, which was frequently made by other contemporary observers, embodied a fundamental truth. Given the technology available in the nineteenth century, the nature of their geography, and their scanty population, the British North American provinces were in fact limited to a modest rate of economic progress in these years, and for long afterward. Not until the opening up of the west and the north, and the exploitation of resources which were unknown or could not be used in the earlier period, would rapid expansion be possible. Meanwhile, the Canadian task in the nineteenth century, to a great extent, was that of a holding action.

Nevertheless, one had indeed to be a "cursory traveller" (as Stanley admitted he was) to see only "supineness and listlessness" in the Upper Canada of the 1820's. After the post-war depression lifted in the early 1820's there was solid progress in agriculture and lumbering, and small processing establishments of various kinds became more numerous throughout the province. Strenuous efforts were made to improve communications both within the province and with the outside world. The need of more elaborate business organization was recognized in the attention that was given to banking. The beginnings of overseas immigration, already described, were a source of optimism and encouragement. On the whole, despite some ex­; ceptions that will be evident, it cannot be said that political unrest in this

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Upper Canada: The Formative Years, 1784-1841
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.