Imperialism at Home: Race and Victorian Women's Fiction

By Susan Meyer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

While I was working on this book I held fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College. I am grateful for their support and to Wellesley College for granting me a leave year in which to complete this project. Earlier versions of parts of the book appeared in Victorian Studies, South Central Review, and ELH, and I thank the editors of these journals and the Trustees of Indiana University for permission to use this material. I also thank Basil Blackwell for granting me permission to reprint Charlotte Brontë's "There was once a little girl and her name was Anne" from Christine Alexander An Edition of the Early Writings of Charlotte Brontë, vol. 1, ( Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1987).

Many of my friends and colleagues have contributed to this book over the years. Patricia Meyer Spacks, and Margaret Homans offered invaluable commentary and guidance at the very inception of this project. Tamar Heller, Charles Hatten, Sue Schweik, Clement Hawes, Kate Brogan, Frances Malino, Vernon Shetley, Barbara Harman, Margery Sabin, and Donald Weber read and responded to portions of this manuscript at various stages; without the ideas they shared with me and their generous and incisive comments the process of writing would have been a struggle far lonelier than it was. I owe a particular debt of gratitude to Laura Levine, Larry Rosenwald, William E. Cain, and Ken Winkler for their willingness at some crucial moments to read and comment so helpfully, and with such rapidity, on pieces of the manuscript. For stimulating conversations about various aspects of the book I am indebted to those mentioned above, as well as to Marina Leslie, Julie Cumming, Lars Lih, Debra Spark, Alison McIntyre, and Luther Tyler. I am especially grateful as well to Rosemarie Bodenheimer and Patrick Brantlinger for their generous and helpful com-

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