Imperialism at Home: Race and Victorian Women's Fiction

By Susan Meyer | Go to book overview

mentary. My work also owes a great deal to anonymous readers for the journals in which I have published and to readers for Cornell University Press, whose detailed comments enabled me to strengthen my argument and to draw out its implications.

Sue Armstrong and Donna Kaiser lived with me during some of the years in which I wrote this book, and I am thankful to them for their friendship and interest in my work, an interest that often helped rekindle my own, and also for helping me unearth some relevant information about obstetrics and folk music. David Pillemer, Susan Hand, and Leanne Harkness kindly helped to provide me with a space in which to work at a point when I was in urgent need of one. I am grateful also to Maureen Paulsen, Alina Kantor, and Sarah Gillis for providing steady and accomplished research and editorial assistance.

The debts of friendship I owe are too numerous to mention here. But I would like to say a word of thanks to Cynthia Schwan, Elizabeth Schwan-Rosenwald, and Lili Schwan-Rosenwald, as well as Larry Rosenwald, for their friendship, encouragement, and support over the years. Without my parents and my sisters and brothers, and the examples of and stimulus to intellectual achievement that they provided me in my childhood, I doubt that I would have become the person who wrote this book. I am deeply grateful to Margaret Homans for her enduring support and encouragement and for the excitement and stimulus of her way of thinking about literature, for her critical energy and generosity. I owe a special debt of gratitude to Donald Weber, whose scholarly example and whose belief in me, over the course of many years, have enabled much of my professional life. Finally, to Ken Winkler, both for his many intellectual contributions to this book, and for making me happy while I completed it, I am more grateful than I can find the words to say.

S. M.

-x-

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