Imperialism at Home: Race and Victorian Women's Fiction

By Susan Meyer | Go to book overview

Conclusion

I have just argued that the plot of the last novel of Eliot career, Daniel Deronda, is propelled toward a nationalistic conclusion. More forcefully than the endings of any of the other novels discussed in this book, Daniel Deronda's closure suppresses the criticism of racial hierarchies, imperialism, and the constraints on women's lives found elsewhere in the novel. The last novel of Eliot's career moves toward a conclusion in which alien races are removed from England: it symbolically enacts racial and nationalistic separation, sending the Jews, who are the novel's "dark race," out of England and into Palestine. The nationalistic ending is inimical to those it represents as racially alien in England, and pro-imperialist in that it imagines a future for the Jews that will be useful to the British imperialist project. At the same time, the nationalistic conclusion is also inimical to those socially transgressive female impulses that the novel has subtly linked with people of alien race: even as it removes those who are racially alien from the world of the novel, it advocates the subordination of the self (and thus the virtual destruction of the female self) in the service of the goals of the larger social group.

The plot of Daniel Deronda moves strongly and consistently toward this conclusion from the moment Daniel is introduced as a character with a mysterious origin. Mordecai himself imagines Daniel's founding of the Jewish homeland as a plot long foretold, and the novel itself would almost seem to concur, given the inspired status it accords Mordecai and the passivity with which Daniel gradually accedes to the narrative Mordecai projects for him. As a result of the plot's virtually ineluctable movement toward its proto-Zionist conclusion, the social values embedded in Daniel Deronda's ending seem very strongly endorsed by the novel. This is more true of Daniel Deronda, for example,

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Imperialism at Home: Race and Victorian Women's Fiction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.