APPENDIX I

THE DIAGNOSIS OF NAPOLEON'S ILLNESS

IN VIEW OF THE PREVALENCE of liver-disease on the island in the early nineteenth century, the contention of the English Government that St Helena was healthy at this time cannot be sustained.1 Dr Stokoe and Dr Antommarchi confirmed O'Meara's diagnosis that Napoleon was suffering from recurrent hepatitis, which he thought to be aggravated by his lack of exercise and addiction to prolonged hot baths.

It is less easy to determine whether these symptoms had any connection with his final, fatal disease. Surgeon-General R. Brice ( Le Secret de Napoleon, 1936) thought that the perforated ulcer found at the post-mortem was caused by a rupture into the stomach of an amoebic liver abscess. Against this theory is the fact that no sign of an abscess of the liver was found at the post-mortem. Professor R. Leriche ( Souvenirs, 1956) recalls that Lord Moynihan, President of the Royal College of Surgeons, showed him in 1927 a specimen preserved in the Hunterian Museum, supposed to be from the stomach of Napoleon. Professor Leriche thought that the perforation was probably dysenteric. The specimen was destroyed in the bombing of London in 1940, and in any case the attribution is doubtful. Bertrand and Marchand record that, on Lowe's instructions, great care was taken to see that the internal organs removed in the post-mortem were sealed up and placed in the coffin.

____________________
See p. 251.

-267-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Napoleon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Corsican Background 15
  • 2 - The Turn of the Wheel 24
  • 3 - Victory in Italy 34
  • 4 - The Eastern Adventure 55
  • 5 - Brumaire and Marengo 68
  • 6 - First Consul 88
  • 7 - The New Charlemagne 103
  • 8 - Austerlitz and the Defeat of the Third Coalition 120
  • 9 - The Napoleonic Empire 131
  • 10 - The Continental System 155
  • 11 - The Spanish Ulcer 164
  • 12 - Wagram and the Awakening of Europe 173
  • 13 - Catastrophe in Russia 185
  • 14 - Leipzig and Abdication 200
  • 15 - The Hundred Days and Waterloo 217
  • 16 - St. Helena 236
  • 17 - The Napoleonic Legend 255
  • Appendix I - The Diagnosis of Napoleon''s Illness 267
  • Appendix II - The Death-Mask of Napoleon 269
  • Select Bibliography 271
  • Index 291
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 304

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.