THREE
THE EUROPEAN IMPACT AND THE SLAVE TRADE

The appearance of Portuguese ships on the west coast of Africa in the fifteenth century marked the beginning of a profound, if gradual, revolution in West African history. There had always been commercial contact with Europe, but it had been indirect, with North Africa acting as intermediary for European merchandise brought there by Genoese or Venetian merchants, who in turn took away the gold of the trans-Saharan trade to feed Europe's currency requirements. Such indirect contact meant that there was no European cultural or political impact. Trade, and political and cultural influence, ran along north-south lines, with the West African empires of the savannah zone reaping the benefit of their middleman position. The coming of Europeans was to lead to a gradual shift of the center of trade; the savannah zone was to lose its predominant position, and the Atlantic coast, instead of being on the edge of commercial life, was to become its center. The coastal states could now build for themselves a middleman position, which they could exploit for political as well as for commercial profit.

Portuguese motives in seeking to establish contact with West Africa were an inseparable blend of economic and religious considerations. Throughout the later middle ages the Christian states of the Iberian peninsula had been steadily expelling Muslim power from Spain and Portugal. At the same time more and more rumors of the trans-Saharan gold trade filtered through, despite Arab attempts to keep it secret. In 1415 the Portuguese crossed the Straits of Gibraltar and took the North African fortress of Ceuta from the Muslims. Among the conquerors was Prince Henry the Navigator, who immediately began collecting information about West Africa from Arab and African traders in the area. He was particularly con-

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nigeria and Ghana
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Modern Nations In Historical Perspective i
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • One - The Land, the People, and the Politics Of Independence 1
  • Two - Origins 33
  • Three - The European Impact And the Slave Trade 71
  • Four - The Nineteenth Century 99
  • Five - The Colonial Period 141
  • Suggested Readings 165
  • Index 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 183

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.