Writing in Limbo: Modernism and Caribbean Literature

By Simon Gikandi | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book began as a study of the influence of modernism on George Lamming's theory and practice of fiction and ended up as an examination of what Edouard Glissant once called the Caribbean irruption into modernity. In trying to reconsider the meaning of modernity as seen from the "margins" of the modern world system, and in struggling to connect modernism, as a theoretical category, to colonialism and nationalism--the two ideas that have determined the production of modern Caribbean literature--I have incurred several personal and professional debts. I wish to thank the American Council of Learned Societies, whose generous grant enabled me to complete my research for this book in both the Caribbean and England. I completed the book as an Andrew Mellon Faculty Fellow at Harvard University, and I thank the fellowship and its director for providing funding at a time when I needed relief from teaching duties. I thank the two anonymous readers for Cornell University Press: their enthusiasm for my work was as validating as their criticisms were constructive; among other things, they reminded me about the importance of historicizing cultural production.

I discovered Caribbean literature and its centrality in the cultures of the African diaspora as an undergraduate at the University of Nairobi,

-ix-

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