Osaka, the Merchant's Capital of Early Modern Japan

By James L. McClain; Wakita Osamu | Go to book overview

Chronology

Era Names during the Early Modern Period

Keichō

1596- 1615

Genroku

1688-1704

Kansei

1789-1801

Genna

1615-1624

Hōei

1704-1711

Kyōwa

1801-1804

Kan'ei

1624-1644

Shōtoku

1711-1716

Bunka

1804-1818

Shōhō

1644-1648

Kyōhō

1716-1736

Bunsei

1818-1830

Keian

1648-1652

Genbun

1736-1741

Tenpō

1830-1844

Jōō

1652-1655

Kanpō

1741-1744

Kōka

1844-1848

Meireki

1655-1658

Enkyō

1744-1748

Kaei

1848-1854

Manji

1658-1661

Kan'en

1748-1751

Ansei

1854-1860

Kanbun

1661-1673

Hōreki

1751-1764

Man'en

1860-1861

Enpō

1673-1681

Meiwa

1764-1772

Bunkyū

1861-1864

Tenna

1681-1684

An'ei

1772-1781

Genji

1864-1865

Jōkyō

1684-1688

Tenmei

1781-1789

Keiō

1865-1868

663 BC (Jōmon epoch)

According to an account in the Nihon shoki, the legendary founder of the imperial line, Jimmu, steps ashore at Nami-haya ("swift waves")

313 AD (First Year in the reign of Nintoku)

Nintoku, head of the Yamato line, builds his famous Takatsu Palace ( Takatsu no Miya) at Naniwa according to the Nihon shiki, although most scholars prefer to place the event at the turn of the fifth century—First Month, third day

512 (Sixth Year in the reign of Keitai)

Envoys from the Korean kingdom of Kudara ( Paekche) stop at Naniwa

593 (Second Year in the reign of Suiko)

Shōtoku Taishi is said to have ordered the construction of the temple Shitennōji

608 (Seventeenth Year in the reign of Suiko)

An official delegation from Sui China arrives at Naniwa and lodges in a new residence constructed especially for the visit

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