Osaka, the Merchant's Capital of Early Modern Japan

By James L. McClain; Wakita Osamu | Go to book overview

A P P E N D I X
The Notification of 1672
(from "Kurama shita
gannin yuishogaki")

NOTIFICATION
Item [1]: None shall transgress the rules as set forth by the shogun's officials. Any violation shall be reported to the political authorities immediately. Matters that are left to the discretion of the association shall be settled at a meeting of the headmen. If they are unable to reach a resolution, the matter shall be referred to the governing officials.
Item [2]: Gambling and games of chance are strictly forbidden.
Item [3]: The small Five-Striped shawl shall not exceed eight sun [approximately twenty-four centimeters] in width.Monks shall be permitted to wear shawls made of ordinary cloth and shoulder surplices inscribed with Sanskrit phrases; both may be decorated with gold threads.Monks are not permitted to wear shawls done in a knotted design or Five-Striped shawls interwoven with gold threads.
Item [4]: Outsiders (tasho no mono) shall not be allowed to join the association of mendicant monks (gannin nakama), even if they apply to do so.Persons of this locale (tōchi no mono) may be admitted to the brotherhood, but they need to be sponsored by a member and must receive the endorsement of the prelates at Daizoin.Prospective members shall be introduced to both groups that comprise the association and shall visit the home temple at Kurama.Afterward, in the company of the headmen, the monthly representative (gatsu gyōji), and the head of his five-man unit (goningumi), the inductee shall visit the appropriate government office and have his name entered into the official register.
Item [5]: Each master shall have no more than the single disciple who resides with him.After securing a sponsor and the approval of the priests at Daizōin, ... [illegible]. One may begin to engage in mendicancies after his name is entered into the official government register; before that occasion one may not engage in any mendicant activity.

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