Osaka, the Merchant's Capital of Early Modern Japan

By James L. McClain; Wakita Osamu | Go to book overview

C H A P T E R E L E V E N
The Distinguishing
Characteristics of Osaka's
Early Modern Urbanism

Wakita Osamu

TRANSLATED BY JAMES L. MCCLAIN

Osaka was born in an age of ferment and strife, the tumultuous Sengoku era when Japan was a Country at War with itself.Centuries before that, at the dawn of Japan's recorded history, people settled the Uemachi Plateau, and in the seventh century contenders for national hegemony had established there a center of imperial authority, short lived though it was.In subsequent centuries, the Watanabe clan put down roots on the estuary of the Yodo and Yamato Rivers, and thriving trading communities eventually grew up nearby at Tennōji, Sumiyoshi, and Sakai. Osaka's conception as an urban center of lasting and permanent significance, however, came only when the prelates of the Honganji branch of the True Pure Land sect (Jōdo Shinshū) founded a temple‐ fortress on the Uemachi Plateau in 1496. Quickly, a prospering town grew up around the religious redoubt, and the Ishiyama Honganji became a center of commerce and culture, as well as the political nerve center for the denomination's far-flung religious monarchy, which at its height embraced tens of thousands of adherents in several provinces.

During the 1570s, Oda Nobunaga saw the sect as standing in the way of his drive to extend hegemony over central Japan, and the warlord threw his legions against the religious armies mobilized by Kennyo Kōsa, the eleventh abbot of the Honganji.Many considered the temple-fortress at Osaka to be impregnable, and the citadel's adherents defended themselves with great resolve during the first half of the decade.In 1577, however, Nobunaga shifted tactics and launched a determined campaign against the Honganji's outer defenses, successfully cutting off the religious stronghold from its affiliated congrega

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Osaka, the Merchant's Capital of Early Modern Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 295

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.