Osaka, the Merchant's Capital of Early Modern Japan

By James L. McClain; Wakita Osamu | Go to book overview

Glossary

allied lord

See fudai daimyō

alternate attendance and residence system

See sankin kōtai

bakufu

The shogunate; the house government of the Tokugawa shogun; presided over the affairs of the nation

bannerman

See hatamoto

bu

As a unit of value for gold and silver coins, one bu was the equivalent of one-quarter ryō; see also fun

bunraku

Commonly used to refer to professional puppet theater, the term derives from the name of a puppet theater established by Uemura Bunrakuken in Osaka at the beginning of the nineteenth century

chō

A residential quarter for merchants and artisans (also read as machi); an officially defined administrative subdivision within a city; each chō was jointly responsible for certain self-administering functions, and each was represented by a neighborhood elder (machidoshiyori); a unit of land measurement, roughly 2.94 acres until Hideyoshi redefined it in 1594, making it equivalent to approximately 2.45 acres

chōnin

Used in various contexts to mean (1) merchant and artisan landholders; that is, persons who were entitled to possess, rent out, sell, and bequeath specified parcels of land, who paid taxes and levies on those plots, and who were eligible to serve as neighborhood elders; (2) merchants and artisans in general; and (3) all nonsamurai who lived in cities

city elder

See sōdoshiyori

city magistrate

See machi bugyō

daikan

Rural intendant; responsible for administering the villages on the shogun's direct holdings

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