The Tempter's Voice: Language and the Fall in Medieval Literature

By Eric Jager | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I AM GRATEFUL to many people for helping me in the course of writing this book.For its early progress I am indebted to Thomas Toon, Thomas Garbáty, Macklin Smith, Ralph Williams, and Charles Witke of the University of Michigan, and also to the late James Downer, whose wisdom and hospitality are remembered by so many.For more recent help, I am grateful to many Columbia colleagues: first, those who generously read sections of the book in draft— David Damrosch, Joan Ferrante, Robert Hanning, David Kastan, Howard Schless, Edward Tayler, and David Yerkes; and, second, those who endured parts of it in colloquia or who offered useful suggestions— Peter Awn, Christopher Baswell, Renate Blumenfeld‐ Kosinski, Caroline Bynum, Ann Douglas, Kathy Eden, Kathryn Gravdal, Patricia Grieve, John McGee, Sandra Prior, James Shapiro, Victoria Silver, George Stade, and Robert Stein.Several fine research assistants— Betsy Beckmann, Sarah Kelen, and James Cain—tracked down elusive materials in the Columbia libraries and, along with the other graduate students in my seminar ( Autumn 1991), contributed valuably to my thinking about this book.

Beyond Columbia, many friends, colleagues, and correspondents have offered advice and help: Edward Baker, Carol Bradof, Susan Burchmore, George Cooper, Kimberly Devlin, Marsha Dutton, Edward Ericson, Allen Frantzen, James Hala, John Lofty, Michael Martin, Vincent McCarren, Pat Moloney, Paul Remley, and John Vickrey.I especially thank Peter Brown and Lee Patterson for their helpful comments on a version of Chapter 2 delivered in a talk at Princeton, and to my host on that occasion, William Chester Jordan.

At Cornell University Press, Bernhard Kendler patiently guided this book into print, and Carol Betsch shepherded it through its production.The readers for the press— Sherron Knopp of Williams College and Ann W. Astell of Purdue University—gave perceptive critiques that enabled me to improve the argument in many ways, large and small. Victoria Haire capably edited the manuscript.

-xi-

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