Manufacturing Inequality: Gender Division in the French and British Metalworking Industries, 1914-1939

By Laura Lee Downs | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has been a long time in the making, and I have acquired many debts. It is a great pleasure to express my gratitude for the generous support I have received along the way. Nearly two years of research in London, Coventry, and Paris and some release time from teaching were made possible by a Bourse Chateaubriand from the French government, a President's Fellowship from Columbia University, a Whiting Fellowship, a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at Columbia University, an American Council of Learned Societies Research Fellowship, and summer travel grants from the Council on European Studies and the Office of the Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan.

Archivists in both France and Britain helped me to locate documents, and lugged volumes of material to and from my desk each day. In between trips, I received much advice and assistance, and, at the Union des Industries Métallurgiques et Minières ( UIMM), a tiny cup of espresso at four o'clock each day, warming the late afternoons of a gloomy Paris winter. I thank in particular Isabelle Brot of the Archives d'Entreprises in the Archives Nationales, Mme Bordes at the UIMM, Mile Vernholes at the Ecole des Surintendantes, Thérèse Doneaud at the Union Féminine Civique et Sociale, M. Suriano at the library of the Paris Chambre de Commerce, Howard Gospel and Leslie Hannah at the London School of Economics, Richard Storey at the Modern Records Centre in Warwick, and the staff at the Coventry District Engineering Employers' Association. I also thank the Engineering Employers' Federation, the Services Photographiques at Thomson-Houston, and the Groupement des Industries Métallurgiques, Mécaniques et Connexes de la Région Parisienne for opening their rich collections to me.

Many scholars and colleagues have read and commented on various parts

-ix-

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