Post-Olympism? Questioning Sport in the Twenty-First Century

By John Bale; Mette Krogh Christensen | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 2
1
Using the cues from this case, my next monograph dealt with continuity in the German sport system (Krüger, 1975b).
2
For the propaganda circulars see Bohrmann (1993). Most of the Circulars for the 1936 Games are in vol. 4; for a general view see Bernett (1985).
3
The Japanese later asked Hitler about his position towards the Japanese people and were reassured that they were not treated like Jews in Germany; see Nakamura (2003).
4
Goebbels kept himself well informed about the discussions at the AAU conference to debate US participation in the Olympic Games (Fröhlich, 1987). Brundage was later recompensed by a huge sum of money as his company received the order to build the new German Embassy in Washington, DC.
5
Baillet-Latour in a letter to Ritter von Halt (26 May 1933), IOC Archives Lausanne, ‘Jeux Olympique de 1936 et la question juive’ (quoted hereafter as IOCA). Germany kept that option open until the very end. However, see Krüger (1994).
6
Baillet-Latour in a letter to the German IOC member, Count von Mecklenburg (21 May 1933), IOCA.
7
Edström in a letter to Baillet-Latour (8 May 1933), IOCA.
8
There has been a long tradition of national Olympics in Germany that was particularly strong in the Turner movement but also nationally during the time when Germany was excluded from the Games (1920–8), see Krüger (1994).
9
There are two records from this interview, one by the interpreter (Schmidt) Political Archives of the German Foreign Minister, P.A. Olympiade 36, A.Z. 86–26, vol. 1 and one by Hitler's personal advisor (Meissner), Federal Archives, Koblenz, B.A. R. 43, II/729 (Reichskanzlei/betr. Olympiade 1936).
10
For the difficult situation of the IOC president, Count Henri de Baillet-Latour, see Lennartz (1994).
11
Hand-written letter by Sherrill to Bailley-Latour (30 August 1935), IOCA.
12
On the whole, Germans knew beforehand what was to be in the foreign press as it provided the Mercedes Schreibdienst, a free speedy typewriter service to foreign journalists: ‘You dictate – we typewrite, without expenses’; see Organisationskomitee (1936, p. 164).
13
Also introduced for the first time 1920, see Coubertin (1920).

-243-

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