Fantasy Literature for Children and Young Adults: An Annotated Bibliography

By Ruth Nadelman Lynn | Go to book overview

1

Allegorical Fantasy and Literary Fairy Tales

The books in this chapter are individual tales with both simple and abstract levels of meaning. Literary fairy tales are short stories written by modern authors in the style of traditional folktales, often utilizing such elements as kings, princesses, dragons, and fairies. Modern allegorical fantasies, unlike traditional allegorical fables, frequently involve characters other than animals, and the full significance of the stories may not be obvious. Collections of literary fairy tales are found in Chapter 3, Fantasy Collections. Retellings of legends and myths, which often have allegorical elements, are found in Chapter 5B, Myth Fantasy.

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ABELL, Kathleen. King Orville and the Bullfrogs. Gr. 2–4.

Three young princes are transformed into frogs and banished after they outdo their father-in-law, King Orville, in a bagpipe contest.

Illus. by Errol Le Cain, Little, 1974, 48 pp., o.p.

(BL 70:871; KR 42:239; LJ 99:1463)

ADAMS, Hazard. The Truth about Dragons: An Anti-Romance. See Chapter 5 A, Alternate Worlds or Histories.

ADAMS, Richard (George). Shardik. See Chapter 5 A, Alternate Worlds or Histories.

ADAMS, Richard (George). Watership Down. See Chapter 2, Animal Fantasy.

AHLBERG, Allan. Ten in a Bed. See Chapter 7, Magic Adventure Fantasy.

AHLBERG, Janet. Jeremiah in the Dark Woods. See Chapter 6, Humorous Fantasy.

AIKEN, Joan (Delano). A Harp of Fishbones and Other Stories. See Chapter 3, Fantasy Collections.

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Fantasy Literature for Children and Young Adults: An Annotated Bibliography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Guide to Use xvii
  • Abbreviations of Books and Review Journals Cited xix
  • Introduction xxiii
  • Notes xlviii
  • Part One - Annotated Bibliography 1
  • 1 - Allegorical Fantasy and Literary Fairy Tales 3
  • 2 - Animal Fantasy 71
  • 3 - Fantasy Collections 133
  • 4 - Ghost Fantasy 176
  • 5 - High Fantasy (Heroic or Secondary World Fantasy) 211
  • 6 - Humorous Fantasy 355
  • 7 - Magic Adventure Fantasy 407
  • 8 - Time Travel Fantasy 466
  • 9 - Toy Fantasy 499
  • 10 - Witchcraft and Sorcery Fantasy 512
  • Part Two - Research Guide 551
  • 11 - Bibliographical and Reference Sources on Fantasy Literature 553
  • 12 - Critical and Historical Studies of Fantasy Literature 562
  • 13 - Educational Resources on Fantasy Literature 591
  • 14 - Fantasy Literature Author Studies 598
  • Author and Illustrator Index 925
  • Title Index 997
  • Subject Index 1043
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