International Cooperation in Research and Development: An Update to an Inventory of U.S. Government Spending

By Caroline S. Wagner; Allison Yezril et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter Two
FINDINGS—U.S. GOVERNMENT SPONSORSHIP OF
INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN RESEARCH
AND DEVELOPMENT
The U.S. federal government spent approximately $4.4 billion on projects involving ICRD in FY97.1 This amount constitutes about 6 percent of the $72 billion of government R&D spending in that year.2 This compares positively with findings from an earlier study analyzing FY95 data that identified $3.3 billion in government funding for ICRD. This number represents a real increase in ICRD between FY95 and FY97. Nevertheless, some of the increase can be attributed to better reporting on the part of agencies as they have become more aware of the importance of tracking and accounting for ICRD activities.Fourteen government agencies actively supported more than $1 million of ICRD in FY97. Over 110 countries have been reported as partners of or as the location for cooperative research activity. Cooperation spans most areas of S&T but is heavily concentrated in aerospace and aeronautics, biomedical and other life sciences, and engineering.This chapter presents the results of our data collection and analysis. The analysis focuses on
the share of ICRD going to multinational and binational activities;
the character of that spending;
international partners in binational collaborations;
fields of science represented in collaborative activities;
agency-level support for ICRD; and
mechanisms for conducting ICRD.
____________________
1
This includes only one-fourth of the funding appropriated for the International Space Station, even though, in its essential mission, the space station is an international project. However, much of the R&D for the International Space Station is done by U.S. researchers, and including the total $1.9 billion of Station funding skews the final number and misrepresents the extent of international research activities.
2
All dollar figures are in actual dollars, not constant dollars.

-7-

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International Cooperation in Research and Development: An Update to an Inventory of U.S. Government Spending
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Acronyms xvii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Findings— U.S. Government Sponsorship of International Cooperation in Research and Development 7
  • Appendix A - Methodology for Data Collection and Analysis 31
  • Appendix B - Internationalization of Scientific Research 39
  • Appendix C - Data Table 47
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