International Law and Ocean Use Management

By Lawrence Juda | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book represents the culmination of an effort that began during my sabbatical leave at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland in 1991. I am most thankful to the staff of the library of that institution who aided me in my search through the literature of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and especially to Professor Lucius Caflisch, who afforded me the opportunity to come to the Graduate Institute and who encouraged my efforts.

While in Geneva I was able to utilize the excellent library facilities of the United Nations and the archives of the League of Nations. I am grateful for the assistance provided me by the staffs of those facilities. I am also indebted to Vicki Burnett of the interlibrary loan office at the University of Rhode Island, who patiently and extremely competently assisted me as I made a continuous stream of requests for esoteric books, articles, and reports which were located in few and remote locations. Her recent retirement is a serious blow to the university’s library and she will be missed.

Various officials in the United States Department of State were of assistance in explaining some of the intricacies of ongoing fisheries negotiations. Annick de Marffy of the United Nations Office of Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea was also very helpful in obtaining needed documentation.

Most of all I want to express my deep and sincere appreciation to my wife Alice who, as a reference librarian at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, assisted me in finding a variety of materials which I could not otherwise locate. With great patience and good humor she brought her professional skills to bear, proofreading my manuscript and bringing a number of problems with the text to my attention. Her professional and personal support, as always, were invaluable and are gratefully and warmly acknowledged.

-ix-

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International Law and Ocean Use Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Preface viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Changing Perceptions of the Oceans and Their Resources 8
  • Notes 39
  • 3 - The Turn of the Century to World War II 49
  • 4 - World War II and the Postwar World 93
  • 5 - The 1958 and 1960 United Nations Conferences on the Law of the Sea 138
  • 6 - The Road to the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea 170
  • 7 - The Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea 209
  • 8 - The Post-Unclos-III System 255
  • 9 - Conclusions 315
  • Bibliography 321
  • Index 340
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