The Economics of W. S. Jevons

By Sandra Peart | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 10.2 THE CURRENCY WEAR CALCULATIONS

1 Distribution of sovereign age, major UK towns or districts

Name of town or district

Proportion of current sovereigns coined in the period

1817-19

1820-29

1830-39

1840-49

1850-59

1860-67

Australian

London

0.1

6.5

5.6

17.1

28.7

40.0

2.0

London further returns

0.1

6.2

6.4

16.9

28.3

40.1

2.0

Manchester

0.1

4.4

4.9

13.1

29.4

46.8

1.3

Manchester (Mr Ross)

0.2

4.3

4.6

11.8

27.7

49.7

1.7

Birmingham

0.2

6.9

6.4

17.1

28.6

39.6

1.2

Swansea

0.2

8.4

7.4

15.7

28.4

37.0

2.9

Hull and Bridlington

0.4

9.3

8.1

20.3

30.8

30.4

0.7

Ormskirk

0.1

6.8

5.7

17.2

31.1

38.2

0.9

Glasgow

0.3

10.6

8.0

12.1

28.3

38.0

2.7

Edinburgh

1.1

8.6

5.5

18.9

25.8

39.0

1.1

Eastern counties

0.2

10.5

11.5

22.0

28.5

25.7

1.6

South-Eastern counties

0.2

7.0

7.8

17.7

29.9

35.7

1.7

South-Western counties

0.4

7.8

8.2

17.2

32.1

32.9

1.4

South Midland counties

0.1

7.8

8.1

19.6

27.6

35.6

1.2

West Midland counties

0.4

9.2

8.2

15.9

27.1

38.3

0.9

North Midland counties

0.4

9.2

7.9

16.6

26.6

38.2

1.1

Lancashire and Cheshire

0.2

7.1

6.3

16.1

26.6

42.5

1.2

Yorkshire

0.3

7.3

6.9

14.9

27.0

42.6

1.0

Northern counties

0.2

6.4

6.6

16.5

26.6

42.7

1.0

North Wales

0.2

8.5

7.5

17.4

27.5

38.1

0.8

South Wales

0.3

7.7

9.5

18.9

26.9

35.6

1.1

Northern Ireland

0.2

5.9

6.6

17.5

31.8

36.8

1.2

Southern Ireland

0.2

9.3

7.3

19.9

29.8

32.2

1.3

Scottish Highlands

0.2

6.6

6.9

17.2

27.5

40.7

0.9

Scottish Lowlands, Bank of Scotland

0.1

7.3

6.2

14.8

28.7

40.6

2.3

General average

0.2

7.4

7.0

16.9

28.6

38.3

1.6

Source: ‘On the Condition of the Gold Coinage of the United Kingdom, with reference to the Question of International Currency’ [1868], in ICF, p. 274

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Economics of W. S. Jevons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements x
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Appendix 1.1 Chronology of Jevons’s Life 8
  • Part I - Macroeconomic Concerns 19
  • 2 - Jevons’s Theory of Economic Growth 21
  • Appendix 2.1 Coal Consumption 42
  • Appendix 2.2 Population Data 44
  • 3 - Sunspots and Expectations 45
  • Part II - Microeconomic Theory 71
  • 4 - Jevons’s Theory of Political Economy 73
  • 5 - Jevons’s Theory of Exchange 90
  • Appendix 5.1 Physics and Neoclassical Economics 114
  • 6 - Production 115
  • Part III - Economic Policy 135
  • 7 - Jevons and Utilitarianism 137
  • 8 - Jevons’s Analysis of Policy 155
  • Part IV - Methodology 171
  • 9 - The Rise of Empirical Methods 173
  • 10 - Jevons’s Empirical Studies 194
  • Appendix 10.1 Jevons’s Commodity Groups, Enlarged Sample 214
  • Appendix 10.2 The Currency Wear Calculations 217
  • Appendix 10.3 The Davenant Corn Law 219
  • Appendix 10.4 Jevons’s 1875 Buys-Ballot Table 220
  • 11 - Conclusion 221
  • Notes 232
  • References 295
  • Index 307
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.