Museum, Media, Message

By Eilean Hooper-Greenhill | Go to book overview

18

Responsive evaluation in museum education

Ian Kelman

Introduction

Museums and galleries offer a wide variety of learning experiences. Their unique contribution is their emphasis on the development of sensory awareness based on work with real objects. C.G. Jung developed a theory that there are two psychological types with essentially different learning styles: sensing types and intuitive types. The sensing type relies to a greater extent on direct sensory experience. The intuitive type enjoys the complex abstract learning gained from probing the outward appearance of things. Children, being closer to the pre-linguistic stage of learning, have a strong preference for learning which has an active element, which engages their senses and stimulates their imagination.

While museum and gallery educators will continue to use methods which rely on reading and writing skills, they have the possibility to develop learning activities which are beyond the scope of most formal education. Over the past forty years a large body of research has developed in all areas of curriculum evaluation. Museum educators must decide which methods of evaluation are most appropriate to their work. This chapter looks at two models of evaluation: the objectives model and the responsive model. It shows how responsive evaluation can be used to gather information about the effectiveness of an education programme at the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne, England.


Evaluation

Evaluation has traditionally not received much attention in museum and gallery education in Britain, partly because of the difficulty of defining the outcomes of a programme and partly because of the resources in time and money required to do the work properly. The present climate, particularly the moves to establishing performance indicators, is increasing pressure to evaluate many parts of the services undertaken by museums. As museum education comes to be seen as a core activity its work will inevitably be questioned. It is therefore important that those involved in this work begin to address the problem of seeking information about the effectiveness of programmes. Evaluation will take place

-204-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Museum, Media, Message
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 300

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.