Sexual Offending against Children: Assessment and Treatment of Male Abusers

By Tony Morrison; Marcus Erooga et al. | Go to book overview

Foreword

The most compelling reason for finding ways of successfully treating people who commit sexual offences against children is one of child protection. Programmes to change the behaviour of offenders may have a beneficial effect on the individuals involved and enable them to rejoin society or to be reunited with their families. But for the majority of workers engaged in managing programmes, in improving practice and influencing policy in this difficult area of social concern, the driving motivation is the need of the victims. This is why those who work with child victims and those who treat the perpetrators of child abuse must continually share information and work together.

Since its beginning in 1986, ChildLine has talked with thousands of children and young people about a wide range of problems, and child sexual abuse has always been high in our statistics. ChildLine counsellors have listened to children talking about appalling abuse: betrayed by those who should care for them, made to feel responsible for the actions of the abuser and ashamed of their part in what has happened. Every day our counsellors hear the confusion of children manipulated and used by abusers, children who wish to avoid the break-up of their homes, who suffer the anxiety of being removed and placed into care and most of all who fear that they will not be believed. Most of the agency’s work involves intra-familial abuse but we also hear from children caught in the web of the paedophile ring or being forced into dangerous sexual relationships.

Hearing this daily cry of pain from victims, one response might be to call on the legislators and judiciary for longer sentences and retribution. This book is essential reading for those seeking policy solutions; for what we also know from the children is that unless there is an alternative to prison, they often will not tell. Indeed, when abusers serve a prison sentence without treatment they are likely to return to their community and to their abusing behaviour. Imprisonment, where at best the abusers’ fantasies are reinforced and, at worst, where further methods of acquiring, grooming

-xiii-

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Sexual Offending against Children: Assessment and Treatment of Male Abusers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvi
  • Introduction xvii
  • Glossary xx
  • 1 - Adult Sex Offenders 1
  • 2 - Context, Constraints and Considerations for Practice 25
  • 3 - Assessment of Sex Offenders 55
  • 4 - Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment of Sex Offenders 80
  • 5 - Groupwork with Men Who Sexually Abuse Children 102
  • 6 - The Management of Sex Offenders in Institutions 129
  • 7 - Adolescent Sexual Abusers 146
  • 8 - Parent, Partner, Protector 178
  • 9 - Where the Professional Meets the Personal 203
  • Conclusion 221
  • Appendix - Appeal Court Guidelines on Sentencing in Cases of Incest 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 240
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