Liberating Literature: Feminist Fiction in America

By Maria Lauret | Go to book overview

INDEX

a
Aaron, Daniel 161
Abel, Elizabeth 100 ;
The Voyage In90
abortion rights 169 , 170 , 172-6
activism:
in Meridian126-9 ;
and personal life 33-5 , 61 ;
see also personal politics
Adams, Louise 70
African-American historiography:
and the novel 135-6 ;
as trauma 126-9 , 139 ;
see also political history
African-American womanhood 134-9 ;
see also black feminism;
black masculinity
African-American writing:
appropriation of, by Atwood 182 ;
and autobiography 116-23 ;
and feminist fiction 79 ;
and Hurston 13 , 36-8 ;
see also black women’s writing
Albert, Judith and Stewart, The 60s Papers163
Allende, Isabel 140
Alpert, Jane 154 ;
Growing Up Underground207 n15
Alther, Lisa:
and feminist criticism 91 , 92 , 93 ;
Kinflicks85,90
American dream, critique of 40-1
American Women52
Americanism:
in Hurston 39 ;
and New Left 152 ;
respiritualisation of 140 , 143
Ames, Lois 210 n20
Angelou, Maya 142 , 166 ;
All God’s Children Need Travelling118 ;
autobiography 8 , 97 , 98 , 107 , 118-21 , 122 ;
Gather Together in My Name118,119 , 120 ;
The Heart of a Woman118 , 119 , 121 ;
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings118 , 119 ;
and 1930s 42 , 43 ;
Singin’ and Swingin’ and Gettin’ Merry Like Christmas118 , 119 , 121
Antin, Mary, The Promised Land207 n21
Arnold, June, Sister Gin94
Aronowitz, Stanley 152
Atwood, Margaret:
Cat’s Eye177 ;
and feminist criticism 43 ;
The Handmaid’s Tale9,88 , 168 , 171 , 172 , 176-83 , 184 , 185 , 186
autobiography 80 , 97-100 , 105-8 , 110-11 , 113-23 , 173 , 177 ;
African-American 116-23
autonomy, female 183-4

b
backlash ‘feminism’ 66 , 71-2 , 165-86
Baker, Ella 48 , 67 , 125
Baldwin, James 143 ;
Nobody Knows My Name121
Barrett, Michèle 162
Barth, John 14 , 78
Barthelme, Donald 78
Battersby, Christine 188
Bell, Bernard 40 , 41 , 138 , 139 , 140 ;
The Afro-American Novel and Its Tradition128 , 129
Belsey, Catherine 76 , 137
Benveniste, Emile 107 , 108
Bernal, Martin, Black Athena205 n20
Bethel, Lorraine 4 , 5
Bettelheim, Bruno 186
Black Arts Movement 141 , 142
black feminism 54 , 67-71 , 142 ;
see also African-American womanhood
black masculinity 131 , 141-2
black nationalism 141 , 143
black women’s writing 35-42 , 116-23 , 126 , 142-3 ;
and white readers

-234-

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Liberating Literature: Feminist Fiction in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface viii
  • Acknowledgements x
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - ‘This Story Must Be Told’ 11
  • 2 - The Politics of Women’s Liberation 45
  • 3 - Liberating Literature 74
  • 4 - ‘If We Restructure the Sentence Our Lives Are Making’ 97
  • 5 - Healing the Body Politic 124
  • 6 - Seizing Time and Making New 144
  • 7 - ‘Context Is All’ 165
  • Conclusion 187
  • Notes 190
  • Bibliography 212
  • Index 234
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