Hugh Gaine: a Colonial Printer-Editor's Odyssey to Loyalism

By Alfred Lawrence Lorenz; Howard Rusk Long | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Printing Away with Amazing Success

To Gaine's new shop one day in the fall of 1754 came Livingston, Scott, and Smith to appeal to their adversary of a year earlier for help. Gaine might have guessed what they wanted. He knew Parker had stopped printing the Reverberator and the Reflector; subscribers had threatened to discontinue the Weekly PostBoy, and Parker had worried, too, that he might well lose his post as public printer if the targets of those two magazines, the Anglican- dominated Assembly, insisted on reprisals.1 Now the three were looking for another outlet for their agitation. They had tried pamphleteering, they told Gaine, but pamphlets they found restrictive; they wanted the larger circulation afforded by a newspaper. Could they have space in the Mercury?

Gaine was reluctant. After all, they had stood on opposing political sides in the bitter fight of the previous year. The printer also remembered the sting of the Assembly's reprimand; and he, like Parker, feared their reaction if he were to publish Presbyterian sentiments. But the memory of his humbling for printing the king's letter to Osborn still rankled, and under strong pressure from the three, Gaine at last agreed to print their material-but for a fee. Livingston confided to a friend: "We have at length with great trouble got Mr. Gaine to enter into an agreement with us to allot

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hugh Gaine: a Colonial Printer-Editor's Odyssey to Loyalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Horizons in Journalism ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 - Apprentice to Publisher 1
  • Chapter 2 - The New-York Mercury 7
  • Chapter 3 - Churchmen and Legislators 15
  • Chapter 4 - Printing Away with Amazing Success 21
  • Chapter 5 - Prelude to a Revolution 29
  • Chapter 6 - No Stamped Paper to Be Had 37
  • Chapter 7 - Fair Liberty's Call 50
  • Chapter 8 - Most Shocking Transactions 65
  • Chapter 9 - Tea, but No Sympathy 80
  • Chapter 10 - Drums, Fifes, and Propaganda -American Manufacture 94
  • Chapter 11 - Patriot in Newark 107
  • Chapter 12 - With the Redcoats 118
  • Chapter 13 - A Printer of Good Reputation 133
  • Notes Bibliography Index 147
  • Bibliography 163
  • Index 177
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.