Does Government Need to Be Involved in Primary and Secondary Education: Evaluating Policy Options Using Market Role Assessment

By Michael T. Peddle | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4

The Administrator

Who Is Responsible for Day-to-Day Operations?

According to The American Heritage Dictionary, the verb to administer means “to have charge of; direct; manage.” In terms of market roles, the administrator is responsible for the day-to-day management of the economic enterprise, for the execution of policy, and for directing the enterprise toward the achievement of its goals and objectives. This market role is one that is simultaneously broad and narrowly constrained. In some of his recent writings and addresses, James M. Banovetz, a noted city management scholar, has drawn an analogy between public managers, specifically city administrators and managers, and baseball managers. His analogy is useful here in helping to explain and differentiate the role of the administrator.

A baseball team is typically run by an owner, a director of player personnel (commonly known as the general manager), and a field manager (commonly known as the manager). 1 In the context of this chapter, the field manager is the one who most directly and regularly plays the role of administrator. The field manager is responsible for setting the lineup, determining day-to-day game strategy, making strategy decisions during the course of the ball game, making personnel changes during the ball game, setting daily schedules for team workouts, and establishing day-to-day team rules.

Analogously, a primary or secondary school system is run by a school board (the “owner’s” representatives), a superintendent (the “general manager”), and principals (the “field managers”). 2 A problem with this analogy is that in many school systems principals do not have control over many of the day-to-day decisions that might be associated with other field managers. As we discuss later in the chapter, school-based or site-based management systems are more precise examples of cases in which principals truly act in the role of day-to-day administrators with requisite powers. In the case of site-based management, the principal typically also inherits the general manager’s powers for administration of his or her school. Although it is easy to get

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Does Government Need to Be Involved in Primary and Secondary Education: Evaluating Policy Options Using Market Role Assessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editors’ Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Prologue 1
  • Chapter 1 - An Introduction to Market Role Assessment 7
  • Chapter 2 - Market Role Assessment 17
  • Chapter 3 - The Regulator 29
  • Chapter 4 - The Administrator 41
  • Notes 56
  • Chapter 5 - The Distributor/Allocator 59
  • Chapter 6 - The Producer 73
  • Chapter 7 - The Auditor 83
  • Chapter 8 - The Financier 107
  • Chapter 9 - The Entrepreneur 133
  • Chapter 10 - Common Ground 151
  • Chapter 11 - School Finance Reform in Practice 171
  • Chapter 12 - Regulatory and Other Nonfinancial School Reforms 193
  • Chapter 13 - School Reform for the Twenty-First Century 209
  • Epilogue 221
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 235
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