Does Government Need to Be Involved in Primary and Secondary Education: Evaluating Policy Options Using Market Role Assessment

By Michael T. Peddle | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9

The Entrepreneur

Who Is the Source of Innovation?

Who Bears the Risk of Innovation?

Entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship have received significant attention in recent years. An increasing number of graduate business schools have entrepreneurship programs, with U.S. News and World Report now recognizing such programs in its subranking of programs within America’s best business schools. The debate over U.S. industrial policy has included significant discussion of entrepreneurship as it relates to economic productivity, with Robert Reich’s The Work of Nations (1991) and Tales of a New America (1987) but two examples of books touching on the theme. Public sector entrepreneurship discussions received a substantial boost with the publication of David Osborne and Ted Gaebler’s 1992 bestseller, Reinventing Government, the subtitle of which is “How the entrepreneurial spirit is transforming the public sector from schoolhouse to statehouse, city hall to the Pentagon.” Contemporary public administration and the modern public administrator are at the center of the debate over entrepreneurship and at the center of attention in terms of producing results for a nation easily enamored by ideas like those expressed by Osborne and Gaebler.

The entrepreneur plays a very important role in the economy. Even though the term entrepreneur is commonly used, the parameters of the entrepreneur’s economic role are often not understood or explained. Unfortunately, it is clear that Osborne and Gaebler do not understand the economic concept of entrepreneur and do great harm by attempting to redefine the term to meet their own needs and desires. 1 Thus, it is important to describe a well-established conception of the entrepreneur’s economic role that can serve as a starting point for this chapter’s discussion.

McConnell and Brue (1990) assign four related functions to the entrepreneur in their categorization of economic resources. They describe these functions as follows:

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Does Government Need to Be Involved in Primary and Secondary Education: Evaluating Policy Options Using Market Role Assessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editors’ Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Prologue 1
  • Chapter 1 - An Introduction to Market Role Assessment 7
  • Chapter 2 - Market Role Assessment 17
  • Chapter 3 - The Regulator 29
  • Chapter 4 - The Administrator 41
  • Notes 56
  • Chapter 5 - The Distributor/Allocator 59
  • Chapter 6 - The Producer 73
  • Chapter 7 - The Auditor 83
  • Chapter 8 - The Financier 107
  • Chapter 9 - The Entrepreneur 133
  • Chapter 10 - Common Ground 151
  • Chapter 11 - School Finance Reform in Practice 171
  • Chapter 12 - Regulatory and Other Nonfinancial School Reforms 193
  • Chapter 13 - School Reform for the Twenty-First Century 209
  • Epilogue 221
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 235
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