Does Government Need to Be Involved in Primary and Secondary Education: Evaluating Policy Options Using Market Role Assessment

By Michael T. Peddle | Go to book overview

Epilogue

School Reform and the Twenty-First Century Public Administrator

Government has important roles to play in the market for and the reform of primary and secondary education. Public administrators must manage or actually perform all of government’s roles, not only in the market for primary and secondary education but in the markets for all goods and services. This is a tremendous responsibility, and in most cases it means that public administrators have a great deal of influence over the path and ultimate success of reform efforts involving government’s role in the economy. The public administrator’s influence often extends to all three branches of government. A brief example will illustrate this point.

A planning director for a municipality is involved in and influences the legislative, executive, and judicial functions of local government. As a city staff member, the director has responsibility for producing studies and opinions that the legislative body can use to make policy decisions. After policy decisions are made, the director and other city staff have the responsibility of implementing and administering the policy. In cases of challenges to policy or its interpretation, the director and city staff are often asked to appear at hearings and trials as expert witnesses. Furthermore, public administrators often write the administrative regulations that courts are asked to enforce in disputes.

Under the status quo, administrators in primary and secondary school systems are asked to perform a similar set of roles. They act as staff on policy issues for the board of education, enforce board and other regulatory policies, and interact with the judicial system with respect to disciplinary, health and safety, and other issues.

Administration of organizations is a genuinely human endeavor, and public administrators are the significant human element of the management of public and nonprofit sector agencies, organizations, and governments. As such, the contemporary public administrator is likely to play a key role in guaranteeing

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Does Government Need to Be Involved in Primary and Secondary Education: Evaluating Policy Options Using Market Role Assessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editors’ Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Prologue 1
  • Chapter 1 - An Introduction to Market Role Assessment 7
  • Chapter 2 - Market Role Assessment 17
  • Chapter 3 - The Regulator 29
  • Chapter 4 - The Administrator 41
  • Notes 56
  • Chapter 5 - The Distributor/Allocator 59
  • Chapter 6 - The Producer 73
  • Chapter 7 - The Auditor 83
  • Chapter 8 - The Financier 107
  • Chapter 9 - The Entrepreneur 133
  • Chapter 10 - Common Ground 151
  • Chapter 11 - School Finance Reform in Practice 171
  • Chapter 12 - Regulatory and Other Nonfinancial School Reforms 193
  • Chapter 13 - School Reform for the Twenty-First Century 209
  • Epilogue 221
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 235
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