The Italian American Experience: An Encyclopedia

By Salvatore J. LaGumina; Frank J. Cavaioli et al. | Go to book overview

D

D’Agostino Sr., Nicholas (1910-1996)

An innovator in the grocery business, Nicholas D’Agostino Sr., was instrumental in developing a chain of supermarkets out of a family business. He was born in Bugnara, Italy, on June 8, 1910, the son of Ignazio and Loretta D’Agostino. In 1924, at the age of 14, Nicholas came with his parents from their native village, not very far from Rome, to New York City and, with his brother Pasquale, helped his father in the sale of groceries. Trained as a butcher, he became an expert on the quality of beef, lamb, and veal available in the city’s main meat market, which he then visited daily. In 1932 he and his brother opened their own grocery store on East 83rd Street and Lexington Avenue in an exclusive area of Manhattan, where they attracted a prosperous clientele. That same year Nicholas married Josephine Tucciarone, and they had three children.

After six years in their own business and in need of more space to expand from groceries and dry goods to meats, the D’Agostino brothers opened up the Yorkville Food Market on Third Avenue and 77th Street. The supermarket for which the family became famous, where shoppers could make most of their grocery purchases all under one roof, was developed here. Having prospered through the Great Depression and World War II, their business expanded into the area of the East River and Peter Cooper Village by the 1950s with more supermarkets equipped with such innovations as shopping carts and freezers to store meats and vegetables.

After Pasquale, who had been president of the family business of eight stores, died in 1960, Nicholas bought out his brother’s share and further improved the supermarkets. Eventually, the stores expanded from the East to the West Side of New York City into a chain of twenty-six extending into Westchester County. Though Nicholas withdrew from the daily operation of the chain in 1964 and passed responsibilities over to his two sons, Nicholas Jr., and Stephen, graduates of the College of the Holy Cross, he remained in the business as a consultant for the next twenty years during which he turned more of his attention to charities, family, and retirement.

Nicholas included among his charities the Catholic Church in the Archdiocese of New York and institutions in his native Italy that cared for abandoned and orphaned children. These and his other humanitarian and philanthropic works flowed from his pioneering efforts as a founder of the supermarket chain that bears his family name. The recipient of the Horatio Alger Award, Nicholas Sr., was honored with the B’nai B’rith Anti-Defamation Award, and, at the time of his death, the Horticultural Society of New York recognized his generous support. He died in Manhasset, Long Island, New York, on June 23, 1996.

Vincent A. Lapomarda


Bibliography
“D’Agostino Founder Dies.” Crain’s New York Business 12, no. 27 (1996):54.
Horowitz, Shel. “D’Agostino: Be a Steam Engine, Not a Boat Anchor.” UMass Family Business Center Newsletter (fall 1995).

See also BUSINESS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Italian American Experience: An Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 12
  • Bibliography 24
  • B 51
  • Bibliography 52
  • Bibliography 54
  • Bibliography 58
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 84
  • C 87
  • Bibliography 88
  • Bibliography 102
  • Bibliography 116
  • Bibliography 138
  • Bibliography 139
  • Bibliography 144
  • Bibliography 162
  • D 163
  • Bibliography 178
  • Bibliography 182
  • E 193
  • Bibliography 204
  • F 209
  • Bibliography 215
  • Bibliography 220
  • G 255
  • Bibliography 266
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 270
  • H 281
  • Bibliography 283
  • I 293
  • Bibliography 294
  • Bibliography 302
  • J 313
  • K 317
  • Bibliography 318
  • L 319
  • Bibliography 330
  • M 353
  • Bibliography 355
  • Bibliography 372
  • Bibliography 382
  • Bibliography 386
  • N 399
  • Bibliography 401
  • O 417
  • Bibliography 422
  • Bibliography 428
  • P 439
  • Bibliography 442
  • Bibliography 446
  • Bibliography 464
  • Bibliography 480
  • Bibliography 486
  • Bibliography 503
  • Bibliography 506
  • R 523
  • Bibliography 538
  • Bibliography 548
  • Bibliography 554
  • Bibliography 558
  • Bibliography 560
  • S 561
  • Bibliography 576
  • Bibliography 577
  • Bibliography 594
  • Bibliography 601
  • T 623
  • Bibliography 624
  • U 645
  • Bibliography 646
  • V 657
  • Bibliography 658
  • W 669
  • Z 707
  • Index 709
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 740

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.