Socialism and Superior Brains: The Political Thought of Bernard Shaw

By Gareth Griffith | Go to book overview

NOTES

1 SHAW’S FABIANISM
1
With respect to Shaw’s conversion to the Fabian theory of rent, it should be noted that the moralism he inherited from Ruskin served as a vital socialist corollary to the marginal utility theory of Stanley Jevons. Shaw discussed the connection between Ruskin and Jevons in 1906, stating, inter alia, ‘Ruskin’s advance was reduced to pure economics by Stanley Jevons, who treated Ruskin’s wealth and illth as utility and disutility…’ (Shaw 1976:8) The influence of Ruskin and Carlyle on Shaw is discussed in Griffith (1979).
2
Echoes of this debate on strategy were to be heard in the career he was forging as a dramatist. Plays Unpleasant, which he introduced as ‘facts for playgoers’ on slum landlordism, marriage and prostitution, were designed to instruct a minority audience of sympathetic enthusiasts. However, by 1893 he was already writing the first of his Plays Pleasant, Arms and the Man, where a very different approach was adopted, more populist and playful and less explicitly socialistic. Proceeding with this broader conception of the policy of permeation, Shaw was to turn to the popular form of the melodrama for inspiration in two of his Three Plays for Puritans -The Devil’s Disciple and Captain Brassbound’s Conversion; there was nothing exclusive or élitist here.
3
Association of the Fabian model of socialism with élitist paternalism, efficiency and organization (as opposed to emancipation) is central to the interpretation found in Greenleaf (1983). This line of interpretation is taken up with respect to the views of five prominent Fabians (including Shaw) on the issue of eugenics in C. Shaw (1987). The Fabian interest in eugenics certainly highlights the anti-egalitarian and undemocratic strands in the thought of its leading exponents. None the less, as Michael Freeden has said, ‘The Mental Climate concerning efficiency has to be borne in mind when examining the issue of the unfit.’ Freeden considers the influence of eugenics on social democratic and liberal thought alike in this period, stating ‘in the first great enthusiasm for eugenics liberals were prominently to the fore, simply because what appealed to them was the rationality of the science, the possibility that man could now control a new aspect of his ‘environment’—his own body’ (Freeden, 1978:185).
4
Shaw did not explicitly link the elimination of the ‘Yahoo’ to the extermination of the poor at this time. Such a connection was common among eugenicists (including Sidney Webb) and it does surface in The Guide (see Chapter 2).

-286-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Socialism and Superior Brains: The Political Thought of Bernard Shaw
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I 21
  • 1 - Shaw’s Fabianism 23
  • 2 - Shavian Socialism 101
  • Part II 155
  • 3 - Sexual Equality 157
  • 4 - The Irish Question 191
  • 5 - War and Peace 216
  • 6 - Fascism and Sovietism 241
  • Part III 275
  • 7 - Conclusion 277
  • Notes 286
  • Bibliography 291
  • Index 300
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.