Ecology, Policy, and Politics: Human Well-Being and the Natural World

By John O'Neill | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I am indebted to many people for helping me in a variety of different ways to produce this book. I would like to thank Andrew Brennan for inviting me to write it and for his assistance in producing the final text. I am also especially grateful to Andrew Collier, Roger Crisp, Russell Keat and Yvette Solomon to whom my thinking on the matters discussed in this book owes a great deal and who read and commented extensively upon an entire draft of the book. They pointed out many weaknesses of argument and made many suggested improvements. The flaws that still exist are there despite their best efforts. The arguments in the book owe much to discussions with colleagues at Sussex University. Rob Eastwood, Mary Farmer and Mark Peacock read earlier drafts of the chapters that deal with economic matters and saved me from a number of errors. Peter Dickens, Richard Gaskin, Ben Gibb, Luke Martell, Trevor Pateman and Neil Stammers all read and commented upon earlier versions of the book and made many helpful suggestions. I am also grateful to the friends and colleagues I have had in Bangor, Lancaster and Bolton: I would especially like to thank John Benson, Alan Holland, Geoffrey Hunter, Jeremy Roxbee-Cox, Frank Sibley and Suzanne Stern-Gillet for their conversations on issues discussed here. Earlier drafts of some of the chapters of this book were read to university seminars at Bangor, Brighton, Bristol, Kent, Lancaster, Liverpool, Southampton, and Sussex: my thanks to those who made numerous helpful comments on those occasions. There are many others whose thoughts, advice and critical comment have been important in writing this book: Robin Attfield, J. Baird Callicott, Alan Carter, Stephen Clark, Harro Hopfl, Paul Lancaster, Keekok Lee, David Miller, Carrie Rimes, Sean Sayers and Richard Sylvan all deserve

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