The Industrial Revolution and the Atlantic Economy: Selected Essays

By Brinley Thomas | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

It is now fashionable for economic historians to play down the Industrial Revolution as an uneventful process of gradual change with nothing ‘revolutionary’ about it. Typical of this view is Nicholas Crafts’ statement that ‘a “cataclysmic” interpretation of economic change in the late eighteenth century is inappropriate. On the whole, recent research has been tending to stress the gradualness of change when seen from a macroeconomic standpoint’ (Crafts 1985:6). This line is made to appear plausible by revised aggregate estimates of Britain’s economic growth in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (Crafts 1983). Some of the revisionists do not lack enthusiasm. Here is an example from a textbook intended to summarize the results of the new economic history.

Compared to its successors…the British industrial revolution was a very modest affair which emerged slowly from the past as part of a long evolutionary process, not as a sharp, instantly recognisable break from traditional experience; its technology was small-scale and comparatively primitive; it needed relatively little additional investment capital.

(Tranter 1981:226)

In the ten years 1790-1800 Britain’s annual output of pig iron went up 100 per cent (from 90,000 to 180,000 tons) and that of coal by 47 per cent (from 7.5 million to 11 million tons). If the 1750-85 trend had continued, the output of pig iron in 1830 would have been 200,000 tons whereas in fact it was 678,000 tons, and the output of coal would have been 12.5 million tons whereas in fact it was 22.5 million tons (see Figure 5.2). In the face of this sharp break with the past, one has to be hopelessly addicted to

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Industrial Revolution and the Atlantic Economy: Selected Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.