Come on Down? Popular Media Culture in Post-War Britain

By Dominic Strinati; Stephen Wagg | Go to book overview

Digging for Britain:

An excavation in seven parts


Dig! Dig! Dig! And your muscles wiill grow big.
Keep on pushing in the spade!
Never mind the worms
Just ignore the squirms
And when your back aches laugh with glee
And keep on diggin’
Till we give our foes a wiggin
Dig! Dig! Dig! to Victory.

(Ministry of Food jingle to promote the 1943 Home Front nutritional self-sufficiency campaign, ‘Digging for Victory’)

…true, for successful excavators, a plan is needed. Yet no less indispensable is the cautious probing of the space in the dark loam, and it is to cheat oneself of the richest prize to preserve as a record merely the inventory of one’s own discoveries, and not this dark joy of the place of the finding itself. Fruitless searching is as much a part of this as succeeding, and consequently remembrance must not proceed in the manner of a narrative or still less that of report, but must, in the strictest epic and rhapsodic manner, assay its spade in ever-new places, and in the old ones delve to ever deeper layers.

(Walter Benjamin, ‘A Berlin chronicle’ from One Way Street (1940))

To write in general terms about the ‘British edge’ is fraught with risk. When words like ‘nation’, ‘culture’ and ‘identity’ are placed together, historiography has a tendency to degenerate into fairy tale and narrative; multi- and multiply contested traditions to congeal into the singular ‘Great Tradition’: a set of lifeless monuments authored by ‘Great Men’. Walter Benjamin’s metaphor of ‘excavation’ provides an alternative model of history writing. His preferred methods for drawing up the stuff of history to the surface through an attention precisely to the detail are well known—his reasoned preference for pastiche, quotation, aphorism over linear ‘reconstructions’; his preference, too, for ‘exhibiting’ the relations in which particular phenomena are embedded rather than ‘explaining’ their imagined origins.

-336-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Come on Down? Popular Media Culture in Post-War Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.