East-West Arms Control: Challenges for the Western Alliance

By David Dewitt; Hans Rattinger | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
George, A., Farley, P. and Dallin, A. (eds) (1988) US-Soviet Security Cooperation. Achievements, Failures, Lessons, New York: Oxford University Press, p. 3.
2
Nye, Joseph S., (1987) ‘Nuclear learning and US-Soviet security regimes’, International Organization 41:3 371-402.
3
Before 1981 the term ‘confidence-building measures’ (CBM) was used to refer to the measures agreed to between the superpowers in the 1960s and in the Helsinki Final Act (1975). The term ‘confidence and security-building measures’ (CSBM) was introduced into the CSCE process (especially by Yugoslavia) to describe the qualitative differences between the relevant provisions of the Helsinki Final Act and the measures proposed at the Madrid CSCE follow-up meeting (1980-3).
4
See the fourth section of this chapter.
5
See Ruggie, John G. (1975) ‘International responses to technology. Concepts and trends’, International Organization 29:3 557-84.
6
See Krasner, Stephen D. (ed.) (1983) International Regimes, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, Krasner, Stephen D. (1985) Structural Conflict. The Third World Against Global Liberalism, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, Keohane, Robert O. (1980) ‘The theory of hegemonic stability and changes in international economic regimes’, in Ole R. Holsti, Randolph M. Siverson and Alexander L. George (eds) Change in the International System, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, pp. 131-62, and Keohane, Robert O. (1984) After Hegemony. Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
7
Viotti, Paul R. and Murray, Douglas J. (1980) ‘International security regimes: On the applicability of a concept’, Paper delivered at the August 1980 meeting of the American Political Science Association, Caldwell, Dan (1981) American-Soviet Relations. From 1947 to the Nixon-Kissinger Grand Design, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, and Jervis, Robert ‘Security regimes’, in Krasner, International Regimes, op. cit., pp. 173-94 have been notable exceptions.
8
This characterization of East-West relations derives from Isaac Deutscher quoted in Halliday, Fred (1983) The Making of the Second Cold War, London: Verso, p. 30.
9
In the international relations literature, the concept of international regime was introduced to analyse the institutionalization of policy co-ordination and co-operation among states to manage economic and technological interdependence problems (see Ruggie, ‘International responses to technology’, op. cit.). Typical cases of international regimes in these issue areas have been the international trade regime (see Lipson, Charles ‘The transformation of trade: The sources and effects of regime change’, in Krasner, International Regimes, op. cit. pp. 233-71, Finlayson, Jock A. and Zacher, Mark W. ‘The GATT and the regulation of trade barriers: Regime dynamics and functions’, in Krasner, International Regimes, op. cit., pp. 273-314), the international monetary regime (see Keohane, Robert O. and Nye, Joseph S. (1977) Power and Interdependence. World Politics in Transition, Boston: Little, Brown, and Cohen, Benjamin J. ‘Balance-of-payments financing: Evolution of a regime’, in Krasner, International Regimes, op. cit. pp. 315-36), and the regime of ocean uses (Keohane, Robert O. and Nye, Joseph S. Power and Interdependence, op. cit.). In the area of international security the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons has been a good example of an issue which has been dealt with by establishing an international regime (see Smith, Roger K. (1987) ‘Explaining the non-proliferation regime: Anomalies for contemporary international relations theory’, International Organization 41:2:253-81).

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