East-West Arms Control: Challenges for the Western Alliance

By David Dewitt; Hans Rattinger | Go to book overview

11

European arms control developments

James Macintosh

It must now be one of the most overworked of clichés to note that Europe has entered a period of genuine transformation during the last 2 years. Cliché or not, it is undeniably the case that the most remarkable events have occurred at a scintillating pace, a process perhaps symbolized best by the dismantling of the Berlin Wall. The Warsaw Treaty Organization has virtually collapsed and, in a stunning reversal, most of its members have begun installing market economies and adopting democratic parliamentary political systems. The Soviet Union has become a dramatically less threatening presence in Europe - and one overwhelmed with a daunting array of domestic problems. German unification in 1991 appears certain, as well, altering fundamentally the political and economic landscape of Europe. The further integration of the European Economic Community appears inevitable as does the Community’s eventual extension north and east.

Most European countries seem inclined to reduce their militaries at a pace exceeding that to be mandated by the emerging Vienna CFE treaty. The wide range of truly significant changes in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as the foreign policy initiatives undertaken by the Soviet Union under President Mikhail Gorbachev, have already helped to transform Europe and its security environment. Much more can be expected to develop in the very near future, as well, as a variety of arms control processes produce tangible results and economic and political processes yield closer ties and stronger integrative impulses.

Despite these seemingly irreversible trends, however, there will remain the distinct possibility of major unrest within Europe, most likely to be precipitated by growing economic, political and social problems in at least several East European countries as well as in the Soviet Union. 1

-272-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
East-West Arms Control: Challenges for the Western Alliance
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.