The Political Economy of Military Spending in the United States

By Alex Mintz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5

Risky Business: US-Soviet Competition and Corporate Profits

Michael D. Ward and David R. Davis

In an earlier article about US-Soviet strategic competition, based on data through the end of 1978, Ward (1984) argued that superpower competition focused not on military budgets but rather on military stockpiles. Decision makers in deciding upon the budget look carefully at competitive weapon stockpiles rather than focusing exclusively on competitive spending levels, a point made convincingly in McCubbins (1983). In finding empirical support for this argument it was argued that the ‘USSR is racing to catch up to the United States’ and that ‘the dynamics governing arms competition between the United States and the USSR appear to be undergoing marked change’ (Ward 1984:297). In concluding that earlier study it was noted:

Having followed different paths, the United States and the USSR have arrived at a position of relative parity. The irony is that reaching that goal may well bring about an increase rather than a decrease in the perceived threat. New paths must be chosen; the old paths are unlikely to serve well in the terrain of the future. (Ward 1984:311)

With the benefit of some hindsight, the above conclusion seems in some respects to be especially informative. The decade of the 1980s ended with a ‘geo-political’ earthquake of enormous proportions, the epicenter of which appears to be in Central Europe. If the first one-half of the 1980s was characterized by increasing US-Soviet tension as the Federation of Atomic Scientists moved the hands of their hypothetical doomsday clock ever closer to midnight—the second half was marked by an enormous relaxation in US-Soviet military and strategic tension. So much so that during the last months of 1988, the Soviet Union began withdrawing military forces in sizable

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Economy of Military Spending in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.