The Political Economy of Military Spending in the United States

By Alex Mintz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10

Guns, Butter, and Debt: Balancing Spending Tradeoffs between Defense, Social Programs, and Budget Deficits

Jin Whyu Mok and Robert D. Duval

The objective of this chapter is to provide empirical evidence of budgetary tradeoffs between defense and various domestic programs in the US federal budget for the period 1954-86. To accomplish this objective, we operationalize the idea of budgetary tradeoffs, incorporate the budget deficit as an additional component of the tradeoff, develop an alternative budgetary indicator, and test its utility in detecting spending tradeoffs.

The most common form of resource allocation in policy making is the budget. In budget-making, the total available revenue in a given year is distributed over various spending categories, presumably in accordance with the level of demands (MacRae and Wilde 1979). Nonetheless, many believe that apparent tradeoffs exist between ‘guns and butter.’ This dilemma depicts spending in military and social policy areas as inversely related to each other. As a nation’s military expenditures increase, the benefits which accrue from social policy expenditures must suffer, ‘if only by a diminution in the rate of increase’ (Dabelko and McCormick 1977:146). For instance, increasing tensions between the superpowers are frequently seen as an important factor influencing strong budgetary commitments to defense among many Western nations. On the other hand, those who support various social programs clearly believe that military programs have resulted in significant tradeoffs to the detriment of the poor, the retired, the disabled, or other beneficiaries of social programs.

Yet, in one of the more sophisticated empirical studies examining budgetary tradeoffs between spending categories, Domke et al (1983) conclude that the idea of choice in budgetary decision making is largely

-196-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Economy of Military Spending in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.