Radical Constructivism: A Way of Knowing and Learning

By Ernst Von Glasersfeld | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

All I have done and written was driven by the wish to acquire an attitude my parents had made me see: to follow clear thinking rather than dogmas, and to be loyal to people rather than nations. Their example was a wonderful gift.

As to the present, I want to acknowledge the loving support and encouragement I got from Charlotte, my wife. Her help should be appreciated by the readers of this book, because it was she who frequently reminded me of Wittgenstein’s famous precept ‘Everything that can be said, can be said clearly’; and it was she who saw to it that my sentences became shorter.

I am deeply indebted to the University of Georgia for having offered me, twenty-five years ago, an academic position though I did not have the usual qualification of a Ph.D. Working with colleagues in the Department of Psychology widened my horizon, and the intensive interaction with graduate students was invaluable in refining my ideas.

I thank Jack Lochhead for having offered me a place in his Institute after I retired from Georgia, for his unwavering friendship and support, and for the many times he pointed out conceptual jumps in my writings.

I also want to thank all those who took my work seriously and wrote about it with understanding—especially Siegfried Schmidt in the German-speaking world, Felice Accame in Italy, Jean-Louis Le Moigne in France, and Jacques Désautels and Marie Larochelle in Canada. That I have benefited from stimulation, help, and support from many others should become clear in Chapter 1.

With regard to this book, I am grateful to Paul Ernest and Falmer Press for having suggested that I write it. I have tried to live up to their expectations. If I were a little younger, I would take another year to iron out the creases. As it is, I hope it will stimulate readers to think along the lines suggested and to plug the gaps I am sure they will find.

Scientific Reasoning Research Institute,

Amherst, June 1994

E.v.G.

-xv-

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