Erotics & Politics: Gay Male Sexuality, Masculinity, and Feminism

By Tim Edwards | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2

Sexual politics and the politics of sexuality

My first encounters with feminism were confusing and conflicting: it often seemed to me that masculinity could be as problematic as femininity but this could not be reconciled with men’s social, economic and political oppression of women. The problem, though, was that my own resistance to the traditional male sex role and lack of conformity to the expectations of masculinity required explaining and this seemed to impinge upon my sexuality. I clearly did not occupy the same position in relation to women as many men did or at least as I perceived them to do. In addition, my developing homosexuality led me to reconsider men and masculinity in terms of my personal relationships with them. Men could clearly be as problematic as some feminist women made them out to be; I became feminist identified: demonstrations of traditional masculinity and machismo were denounced as divisive, conformist, and even downright misogynist. It made little difference if they were gay or straight, in fact the sexual objectiftcation of some aspects of the gay subculture was worse. However, I was also still aware that many gay men were struggling to come to terms with themselves and their sexuality and some forms of judgemental feminism seemed to damage the situation. In addition, I could not account for the fact that I was still attracted to some forms of masculinity sexually and it was easy to see the alternative positive aspects of gay culture and casual sexual encounters in supporting the development of individual sexuality. Moreover, it became clear that such encounters were not necessarily as masculinist as they seemed and involved affection, consideration, even intimacy. Furthermore, this was not completely incompatible with other states of consciousness or political conviction. However, certain contradictions remained unexplained. In particular, the combination of feminist and gay identification was becoming problematic. Was it or was it not possible to successfully combine them? Consequently, can one create, or put together, a sexual politics with a politics of sexuality? These are the questions, and others, which I shall attempt to answer in this chapter. The personal and the political remain as complex as ever.

The primary purpose of this chapter is to explore and examine the impact of feminism upon gay (male) liberation and lesbianism, both

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Erotics & Politics: Gay Male Sexuality, Masculinity, and Feminism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.