Erotics & Politics: Gay Male Sexuality, Masculinity, and Feminism

By Tim Edwards | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8

Politics, plurality and postmodernity

I said to a friend of mine recently in a not very postmodern restaurant over lunch that my sexuality did not matter any more, what did still matter was my identity. Consequently, gayness wasn’t necessary or even necessarily the case as a sexual orientation; it was, however, still critical as a self—other organising device, a political perspective, a viewpoint on life: an identity. He, conversely, was straight in identity and yet equally open in orientation. The sexual signification and the institutional and social dimensions of sex far outweighed the significance of sex itself in either case. Prior to this discussion, I had seen postmodernism, like most people, I suspect, as some kind of lunatic arty-farty apolitical problem for the rest of us that made an awful lot of money and not a lot else. I since lived with someone heavily into it for nine months and the walls of the house fairly regularly rang to the sound of raised voices over the issue: were we or were we not ‘postmodern’ now, or would we, or could we be, and what would it or does it mean. Moreover, I was never the most committed of socialists until postmodernism offered itself up for attack. Consequently, the discussions over postmodernism were constantly framed in a context of socialism versus postmodernism that also, curiously, frames the whole academic discussion of the issue too. I suspect also that each of us now recognises the other had the odd point: I certainly do. The other main turning point was realising postmodernism was not quite what I thought it was and that what I was usually reading as slightly post-structuralist social constructionism was postmodernism. Moreover, I suspect the real appeal of postmodernism is that it’s more fun. The real death of socialism, if there is one, I suspect is due to the fact that it’s dreary, dull and, dare I say it, BORING—what would you rather do—wear your favourite pink T-shirt or a gender-free, second-hand, dishwater jersey; vogue it up to Madonna or spend rainy Saturdays selling free papers; study David Lynch at the cinema or Lenin in a crowded café? Well, I know what I’d do and I know what a lot of others do too. Either way, you can still make out it’s all ‘OK’ as part of the politics of postmodernity. If only it were so simple…

Postmodernity theory has developed into something of an uncritical consensus in the study of sexuality over the past five years since

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Erotics & Politics: Gay Male Sexuality, Masculinity, and Feminism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.