The Female Face of God in Auschwitz: A Jewish Feminist Theology of the Holocaust

By Melissa Raphael | Go to book overview

6

The redemption of God in Auschwitz

Come and see how beloved Israel is before God; for wherever they went into exile the Shekhinah went with them. When they were exiled to Egypt, the Shekhinah went with them, in Babylon the Shekhinah was with them, and in the future, when Israel will be redeemed, the Shekhinah will be with them.

(Megillah 29a)


PART I

Jewry’s eternal presence (or the stopping train)

The closing sequences of two recent films set during the Holocaust, Korczac and Jakob the Liar, 1 are similar in one respect: both of their directors refuse to end their stories (the former historical and the latter a fable) with the death of the Jews whose deportation they narrate. Both films end with the train stopping before its destination, a death camp. In Korczac, the orphaned children, Janusz Korczak and the other adults caring for them, tumble in serene slow motion from the train into the fields as if to play. 2 In Jakob the Liar, deliverance unfolds in just the surreal manner Jakob had promised them it would: the liberating Soviet troops stop and surround the train, playing exuberant American jazz from the open tops of their tanks. The lies that were Jakob’s stories of comfort and consolation become the audience’s fantastic truth. In both of these films, the audience experiences a redemption from death, even while conscious that, historically, these particular deliverances did not and could not have occurred. An empty train reversed out of Auschwitz.

There will be those who regard such films as taking unwarranted artistic licence with history; as the seduction and reward of an audience about to leave the cinema by an ending that can only uplift because the horror is left out of shot. But in neither of these two films does the stopping train represent a facile ‘happy ending’ or an admission that the terminus of the gas chambers is cinematically unrepresentable (which is almost undoubtedly the case). Theologically, the train had to stop to signify that there was something about the story of those Jews which was wholly interruptive and transcendent of the means and processes of their death.

-128-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Female Face of God in Auschwitz: A Jewish Feminist Theology of the Holocaust
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editors’ Preface vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Reading Post-Holocaust Theology from a Feminist Perspective 19
  • 2 - The Hiding of God’s Face in Auschwitz 43
  • 3 - Feminist Intimations of the Holy in Auschwitz 59
  • 4 - Face to Face (With God) in Auschwitz 86
  • 5 - A Mother/God in Auschwitz 107
  • 6 - The Redemption of God in Auschwitz 128
  • The Princess and the City of Death 161
  • Notes 166
  • Select Glossary of Hebrew and Yiddish Terms 205
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.