The Female Face of God in Auschwitz: A Jewish Feminist Theology of the Holocaust

By Melissa Raphael | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1
Arthur Cohen, ‘Some Theological Implications of the Death Camps’, in David Stern and Paul Mendes-Flohr (eds), An Arthur A. Cohen Reader: Selected Fiction and Writings on Judaism, Theology, Literature and Culture, Detroit, Wayne State University Press, 1998, p. 235, and idem, The Tremendum: A Theological Interpretation of the Holocaust, New York, Continuum, 1993, p. 2.
2
After Tragedy and Triumph: Essays in Modern Jewish Thought and the American Experience, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1990, p. 3.
3
Michael Goldberg has expressed fears that a cult of the Holocaust is supplanting Judaism itself. (Why Should Jews Survive? Looking Past the Holocaust Toward a Jewish Future, New York, Oxford University Press, 1995, p. 49). The ‘Americanization’ of the Holocaust refers to the colonization of the Holocaust, rendering it palatable for American consumption and deployable in the promotion of specific political and ideological agendas. See e.g. Hilene Flanzbaum, ‘The Americanization of the Holocaust’, Journal of Genocide Research 1 (1999), pp. 91-104; Berenbaum, After Tragedy and Triumph, pp. 8-16.
4
See further Anne Michaels’ novel, Fugitive Pieces, London, Bloomsbury, 1998, pp. 159-60.
5
Cohen, The Tremendum, p. 23.
6
Love’s Work, London, Vintage, 1997, pp. 10-11.
7
Cohen, The Tremendum, p. 107. He concludes, ‘I find this no reason to despair of theological discourse, no reason to dismiss its findings’ (ibid.).

Introduction
1
Joan Ringelheim, ‘The Split between Gender and the Holocaust’, in Dalia Ofer and Lenore J. Weitzman, (eds), Women in the Holocaust, New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 1998, pp. 346-9.
2
This enumeration of holocaustal factors affecting women, and mothers in particular, is indebted to Miriam Gillis-Carlbach, ‘Jewish Mothers and Their Children During the Holocaust: Changing Tasks of the Motherly Role’, in John K. Roth and Elizabeth Maxwell (eds), Remembering for the Future: The Holocaust in an Age of Genocide, Basingstoke, Hampshire, Palgrave, 2001, pp. 230, 237-8. There is now too considerable a literature on women’s ‘double jeopardy’ to cite in the present note. See e.g. Myrna Goldenberg, ‘Different Horrors, Same Hell: Women Remembering the Holocaust’, in Roger S. Gottlieb (ed.), Thinking the Unthinkable: Meanings of the Holocaust, New York, Paulist Press, 1990, pp. 150-66 and ‘ “From a World Beyond”: Women in the Holocaust’, Feminist Studies 22 (1996), pp. 667-87; Marion A. Kaplan,

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The Female Face of God in Auschwitz: A Jewish Feminist Theology of the Holocaust
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editors’ Preface vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Reading Post-Holocaust Theology from a Feminist Perspective 19
  • 2 - The Hiding of God’s Face in Auschwitz 43
  • 3 - Feminist Intimations of the Holy in Auschwitz 59
  • 4 - Face to Face (With God) in Auschwitz 86
  • 5 - A Mother/God in Auschwitz 107
  • 6 - The Redemption of God in Auschwitz 128
  • The Princess and the City of Death 161
  • Notes 166
  • Select Glossary of Hebrew and Yiddish Terms 205
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 221
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