Stillness in Motion in the Seventeenth Century Theatre

By P. A. Skantze | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1
From the Advancement of Learning, “certain it is, through a great secret of nature, that the minds of men [sic] in company are more open to affections and impressions than when alone” (Francis Bacon 1605).
2
I am indebted to the last decade of performance studies work specifically focused on ‘how’ theatre and performance works, particularly that of Joe Roach, Susan Leigh Foster, Mark Franko, and Susan Melrose.
3
In his Introduction Fox corrects the inherited theory of thinking of oral and literate as a binary: “England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, therefore, was a society in which the three media of speech, script and print infused and interacted with each other in myriad ways… There was no necessary antithesis between oral and literate forms of communication and preservation…the written word tended to augment the spoken…any crude binary opposition between ‘oral’ and ‘literate’ culture fails to accommodate the reciprocity between the different media of this time (2000:5-6).
4
Thinking about the object as an object, the hands holding the object book, reminds one of Peter Stallybrass’ supposition in his delineation of “objectness”: “the object then takes on inestimable value. For, in working upon it [or holding and reading it], the bondsman [reader] comes to recognize her or his identity as an objective being or ‘objective personality’ - that is, a being in need of outside objects and in need of being an outside object to another” (1999:4). See the Prologue for a discussion of the paradox of book as object in hand but not always an object in reception.
5
As M.T. Clanchy reminds us, one of those traces is to a time when evidence was trustworthy because spoken by a human being. When no one could be found who could remember, the court could not resolve the case because it was “time out of mind” (1993:152).
6
“Customarily it was three trumpet blasts, filling all the 231,028 cubic feet of the acoustic space, that signaled the start of performances at the Globe” (Smith 1999:218). In the private theatres the audience heard “consort music” (222).
7
Readers will hear an echo of Elin Diamond’s phrase, “a thing doing and a thing done” (1998).
8
Mark Rose makes an important distinction in a discussion of censorship between the beginning of the seventeenth century and the end of it when he suggests that in the early part of the century texts were thought of as “actions,” valued “for what they could do…later, treating texts as aesthetic objects was commensurate with a system of cultural production based on property” (1993:13). See Chapter 5 and Epilogue for the increasing influence upon the values of the still and the moving made through the language of property.

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Stillness in Motion in the Seventeenth Century Theatre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Prologue 21
  • 1 - Permanently Moving 30
  • 2 - Predominantly Still 59
  • 3 - Theatrically Pressed 82
  • 4 - Decidedly Moving 106
  • 5 - Perpetually Stilled 132
  • Epilogue 154
  • Notes 162
  • Bibliography 187
  • Index 202
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