Colour Prejudice in Britain: A Study of West Indian Workers in Liverpool, 1941-1951

By Anthony H. Richmond | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
ADJUSTMENT OF WEST INDIANS

THE report so far has dealt with various aspects of group relations. In this chapter attention will be paid to the individual adjustment of the West Indian to life in Britain. In order to do this it is necessary to have a means of measurement of adjustment, and a scale has been devised. The scale was based upon documentary records regarding the West Indians contained in the individual case files kept by the Welfare Officer. The five-point scale of adjustment was drawn up in the same way as the scale of skill and ability at work which has already been described.1. It is unfortunate that there was no way in which comparisons could be made between the adjustment of West Indians and that of other workers in the factories. This would have necessitated some kind of control group which it was not possible to secure. The scale, therefore, is a relative one which enables comparisons to be made between one West Indian and another only. Having placed each man on the adjustment scale according to the documentary records available a more detailed investigation was made in the course of interviews with a number of men.2. The men taken for more detailed study were selected at random and, whilst not representing in any way a statistically significant sample, they were a cross-section of those in the scheme. Ten very detailed case histories were made, two for each of the points on the adjustment scale. Unfortunately, limitation of space and the danger that the individuals concerned might be identified has prevented the publication of the full case studies.3


1. THE SCALE OF ADJUSTMENT

The term adjustment here implies the acceptance by the individual

____________________
1
Pages 11 and 32
2
See Appendix, p. 172
3
In order that bona fide research students may have access to these detailed case studies a copy of the original manuscript has been deposited in the Countee Cullen Negro Collection in the Trevor Arnott Library of Atlanta University, U.S.A.

-109-

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