Regulating Tobacco

By Robert L. Rabin; Stephen D. Sugarman | Go to book overview

1
Perspectives on Policy: Introduction
Robert L. Rabin & Stephen D. Sugarman

Tobacco policy has assumed center stage in recent years. A product responsible for more than 400,000 premature deaths annually in the United States alone clearly raises a serious public health concern. Yet in our society there is a strong presumption that freedom of choice to engage in risky activities ought to be protected from paternalistic regulation (at least so long as the activities result in no harm to others). As a consequence, it does not follow inexorably that public health concerns require governmental action. Perhaps the clearest evidence in support of this proposition is the lack of any discernible current support for an absolute prohibition on the sale and consumption of tobacco products. Correspondingly, until very recently, the tobacco industry relied, with unbroken success, on this same personal responsibility theme in the judicial forum as the foundation of its defense to smokers' compensation lawsuits.

Nevertheless, over the course of almost four decades, since the surgeon general's famous 1964 report on smoking, a consensus has arisen that governmental intervention to control tobacco use is not only legitimate but essential. Indeed, the tobacco industry itself, in the face of unassailable evidence and public indignation, no longer contests the need to curtail youth access and ensure adult awareness of the dangers of smoking. But there has been and remains intense controversy over precisely what tobacco control policy should include.

There is, after all, a broad continuum of potential tobacco control strategies that lie between prohibition as a proactive extreme at one end and health risk warnings as a minimalist measure at the other. This book is aimed at

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Regulating Tobacco
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents vii
  • About the Contributors ix
  • Regulating Tobacco *
  • 1 - Perspectives on Policy: Introduction 3
  • 2 - The Politics of Tobacco Regulation in the United States 11
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 3 - Taxing Tobacco: The Impact of Tobacco Taxes on Cigarette Smoking and Other Tobacco Use 39
  • References *
  • 4 - Marketing Policies 72
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 5 - Reducing Harm to Smokers: Methods, Their Effectiveness, and the Role of Policy 111
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 6 - Reducing the Supply of Tobacco to Youths 143
  • References *
  • 7 - The Third Wave of Tobacco Tort Litigation 176
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 8 - Clean Indoor Air Restrictions: Progress and Promise 207
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 9 - International Aspects of Tobacco Control and the Proposed Who Treaty 245
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Index 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.