9
The Future of Violence Risk Management
John Monahan

Injustice and inefficiency invariably flow from any blending of the criminal-law and mental health powers of the state. Each is sufficient unto itself to achieve a just balance between freedom and authority; each has its own interested constituency; when they are mixed together, only the likelihood of injustice is added. (Morris 1982, p. 31)

Despite this prescient warning, a blending of the criminal justice and mental health systems is exactly what is happening in the United States, and what may be on the verge of happening in the United Kingdom as well. On the mental health side, the blending has taken the form of a resurgent emphasis on the state's police power as the principal justification for the civil commitment of people with serious mental disorder who have committed no crime but who are believed to be “dangerous to others.” The result has been the first significant loosening of the 1960s-era libertarianoriented standards for involuntary treatment as a hospital inpatient, and the first meaningful laws ever that allow for involuntary treatment in the community. On the criminal justice side, the blending has come as statutes have proliferated, and been upheld, authorizing the indefinite civil commitment in a mental hospital of convicted offenders who are believed to have a “mental abnormality”—which need not rise to the level of a “mental disorder”—and are found likely to recidivate. To date, these statutes have been limited to offenders convicted of sexually violent offenses, but proposals have been introduced in the United States and in the United Kingdom to expand them to the perpetrators of any form of violent act.

Both of these moves toward convergence have been facilitated by developments in the professional technology that enables their operation: violence risk assessment. After two decades of largely depressing research on the abilities of mental health professionals at predicting violence, the journals are suddenly replete with guardedly optimistic studies indicating that actuarial instruments may succeed where clinicians have failed. For the first time, relatively accurate assessments of the risk of violence that

-237-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Future of Imprisonment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface v
  • Contents *
  • Contributors viii
  • The Future of Imprisonment *
  • 1 - Has the Prison a Future? 3
  • References *
  • Part I - How Much Imprisonment Is Too Much? 25
  • 2 - Crime, Law, and the Community: Dynamics of Incarceration in New York City 27
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 3 - Restoring Rationality in Punishment Policy 61
  • Notes *
  • References 79
  • Part II - Going in 81
  • 4 - Limiting Retributivism 83
  • Notes 113
  • References *
  • 5 - Sentencing Reform “Reform” through Sentencing Information Systems 121
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Part III - Being There 154
  • 6 - Democracy and the Limits of Punishment: a Preface to Prisoners' Rights 157
  • References *
  • 7 - Prison Reform amid the Ruins of Prisoners' Rights 179
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Part IV - Coming out 197
  • 8 - Questioning the Conventional Wisdom of Parole Release Authority 199
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 9 - The Future of Violence Risk Management 237
  • Notes *
  • References *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.