Securing the U.S. Defense Information Infrastructure: A Proposed Approach

By Robert H. Anderson; Phillip M. Feldman Scott et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter Three
VULNERABILITIES

To support the implementation of the six-step MEII process outlined above, we have identified a set of generic vulnerabilities characteris/ tic of networked information systems of the type on which the DoD and U.S. critical information infrastructures depend. In general, vul/ nerabilities range from straightforward physical destruction (blowing up a public switched network switching center with high explosives) to sophisticated induced failure cascades (loss of critical control networks due to cyber-attack leading to loss of service in the con/ trolled systems, leading to further failures). Certain vulnerabilities may be exploitable only when immediate opportunities present themselves (e.g., a sniffer finds a password). These may not be ex/ ploitable in a situation in which an adversary is making war plans to be executed months in the future (the password might be changed), but they could make a mischievous hacker happy. In fact, most cy/ berspace vulnerabilities that have been identified (or experienced) to date are of this limited, ad hoc nature. Might there be others with more conventional military value? That is the topic of this chapter.

It will be easier to illustrate the vulnerabilities and the application of responsive security techniques if we focus our discussion on one portion of the defense information infrastructure. We thus begin with a description of a particular set of information systems. The chapter continues with some illustrations of vulnerabilities within those systems. We then present and discuss our list of generic

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Securing the U.S. Defense Information Infrastructure: A Proposed Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 158

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.