Securing the U.S. Defense Information Infrastructure: A Proposed Approach

By Robert H. Anderson; Phillip M. Feldman Scott et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
RESPONSIVE SECURITY TECHNIQUES

To identify security techniques that might address the vulnerabilities identified in Chapter Three, we reviewed research and development efforts in information system architecture and design and in cy/ berspace security and safety, and drew on our own experience in these areas. It is noteworthy that some researchers are applying bio/ logical principles associated with survivability and protection to in/ formation-based systems. Some research on information system se/ curity is even “biomimetic,” in the sense that it uses approaches that mimic biological systems such as the human immune system. A de/ tailed discussion and analysis of these biological metaphors and analogies, and their application to information systems, is provided in Appendix C. See Chapter Six for more on the status of research on information system security techniques.

In this chapter, we provide a brief definition and description of cate/ gories of security techniques, each of which is intended to perform one or more of the following security functions: make the system less vulnerable in advance of an attack, detect an attack, and react to an attack once it is initiated. This chapter includes one or more ex/ amples of how techniques of each type can be applied to increase the security and survivability of an information-based system.

It is important to realize at the outset that technical constraints make it impossible or infeasible to eliminate certain vulnerabilities by straightforward redesign. Technical solutions may not yet exist, they may be too expensive to implement, or they may have undesirable consequences—they may eliminate desired performance character/ istics or generate other vulnerabilities. For example, systems allow/

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