NATO Enlargement, 2000-2015: Determinants and Implications for Defense Planning and Shaping

By Thomas S. Szayna | Go to book overview

Chapter Six
CONCLUSIONS

NATO's post–Cold War enlargement has provoked a heated debate on the wisdom of enlargement and NATO's eventual composition. The 1999 accession of three new members and NATO's identification of nine states as on track to membership have led some analysts to caution that NATO's cohesion is at risk.1 Although these concerns are real, the fears are probably exaggerated. NATO's founding document defines the alliance as open to all European states sharing its values, and until NATO's members modify that clause, it remains in force. But being open to new membership does not in any way obligate NATO to accept new members, especially if current members judge an accession to be damaging to the overall security environment.

As a result, the existence of countries that aspire to NATO membership does not mean that all or even more than a few of them will be admitted to NATO in the foreseeable future. NATO's elaborate criteria for new members have established a high standard for aspiring states, one that several (at least four) of its pre-1990 members cannot meet. Moreover, NATO explicitly stated in its 1995 enlargement study that it is up to NATO members to decide if and when additional states will be invited. The analysis in this report suggests that

____________________
1
Some analysts are supportive of enlargement but worry about the pace of the process and its impact on NATO's ability to undertake military operations (Hans Binnendijk and Richard L. Kugler, “Open NATO's Door Carefully,” The Washington Quarterly, 22:2, Spring 1999, pp. 125–138). Others fear that the process will fall prey to its own dynamics and detach completely from any strategic rationale (Karl-Heinz Kamp, “NATO Entrapped: Debating the Next Enlargement Round,” Survival, 40:3, Autumn 1998, pp. 170–186).

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
NATO Enlargement, 2000-2015: Determinants and Implications for Defense Planning and Shaping
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xiii
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - The Planning Context 5
  • Chapter Three - Patterns in the Enlargement Process 41
  • Chapter Four - Assessing Candidates for Future Accession to NATO 49
  • Chapter Five - Shaping the Forces of Aspiring Members 107
  • Chapter Six - Conclusions 131
  • Appendix - Inventory of Aircraft and Helicopters in the Map States 147
  • References 155
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 165

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.