Dictionary of Concepts in Human Geography

By Robert P. Larkin; Gary L. Peters | Go to book overview

Preface

Human Geography is a broad subdivision of the field of geography that deals with the geographic interpretation and analysis of human cultures, societies, and lifestyles. This volume provides brief essays and bibliographies, for selected concepts in human geography, including the subfields of cultural geography, economic geography, behavioral geography, population geography, political geography, and urban geography. Concepts were selected with the help of a number of distinguished geographers who were willing to take the time to make additions and deletions to our initial list. We would like to extend our thanks to each of these colleagues: E. Willard Miller, Ted Myers, Yi-Fu Tuan, Gary Klee, and Chris Exline.

For each concept we have attempted to provide definitions, arranged from earliest to most recent, and to trace the evolution of the concept as it is understood by geographers. Each entry ends with a set of references and a list of additional sources of information. With an entry, the name of another concept in SMALL CAPITAL LETTERS indicates that there is a separate entry on that concept in this book.

We hope that geographers and librarians will find this reference volume useful. Although we could not include every concept in human geography, we have endeavored to include those that we and our colleagues deemed most important. We appreciate the help and advice we received, but we alone must accept the blame for whatever shortcomings the volume may have.

We would like to thank Ray McInnis, the series editor, for his suggestions and criticism, and Bonnie Frick for writing the Foreword. We would also like to thank our wives, Joyce and Carol, for their patience and understanding during the writing of this book.

-ix-

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Dictionary of Concepts in Human Geography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • The Dictionary 1
  • A 3
  • B 20
  • C 30
  • D 59
  • E 65
  • F 99
  • G 103
  • H 125
  • I 129
  • J 135
  • L 139
  • M 154
  • N 171
  • P 177
  • R 197
  • S 213
  • T 261
  • U 264
  • V 272
  • Index 275
  • About the Authors 286
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