The Impeachment and Trial of Andrew Johnson

By Michael Les Benedict | Go to book overview

6

Verdict

AS REPUBLICAN SENATORS voted on the legal issues involved in rejecting and accepting evidence, it became apparent that a large number of them would not vote guilty on all the articles. Many concluded that impeachment lay only for a positive violation of law and dismissed Butler's tenth article, which alleged no such violation. A large number decided that Johnson had never intended to use force to remove Stanton and would therefore vote against Article IX and probably Articles VI and VII as well. The Senate had refused to accept evidence the managers offered to prove Article VIII, and that too would probably fall. 1. Moreover, a number of Republicans had shown signs of accepting the defense argument that the President should not be removed if he violated the Tenure of Office Act only to raise a court case. Combined with Democrats and Johnson Conservatives, these were more than enough to prevent the President's removal. Senator Samuel C. Pomeroy carefully canvassed the Senate and determined that only about twenty-five of the forty-two Republican senators intended to convict on all the articles. 2.

By mid-April, Republicans suspected that impeachment might fail. Senator Joseph S. Fowler clearly signified his intention of voting not guilty, leaving his seat each day as the Senate resolved into a quasi-court to try the impeachment and taking a new place among the Democrats. Grimes, too, freely ac‐

____________________
1.
Trial of Andrew Johnson, I, 257-68 (April 2, 1868).
2.
Sumner to Edward L. Pierce, July 20, 1868, Sumner Mss.

-168-

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The Impeachment and Trial of Andrew Johnson
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Impeachment and Trial of Andrew Johnson *
  • Contents *
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Andrew Johnson, the Republicans, and Reconstruction 1
  • 2 - Presidential Obstruction and the Law of Impeachment 26
  • 3 - The Politics of Impeachment 61
  • 4 - Johnson Forces the Issue 89
  • 5 - Trial 126
  • 6 - Verdict 168
  • Epilogue 181
  • Appendix 185
  • A Bibliographical Review 192
  • Index 203
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