Studies in the History of French Political Economy: From Bodin to Walras

By Gilbert Faccarello | Go to book overview

Notes
1
An abridged version of the first part of this chapter was published in The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, I (3), autumn 1994, pp. 519-550.
2
[Quam tua te fortuna sinet. ] Virgil, Aeneid, VI, 95.
3
There is a great body of historical and theoretical writing on Turgot. For theoretical aspects not dealt with in this chapter, the reader may refer to the texts listed in the References (Faccarello, 1990, 1992b, 1996; Groenewegen, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1983).
4
The Contrôleur général des finances was the French minister of finance.
5
The word ‘reformer’ is more appropriate here than the all too frequent ‘liberal’: the latter constitutes an anachronism and inevitably conveys nineteenth-and twentieth-century ideas which do not fit the period prior to the French Revolution.
6
Six editions of this book were published between 1753 and 1757. Beginning as a short study (53 pages in-octavo in 1753) the Essai turned into a much bigger book from the fourth edition (1754) onwards. It was still very frequently referred to at the beginning of the 1760s.
7
A law prepared by Daniel Trudaine and C. J. M. Vincent de Gournay in particular, and promulgated in September 1754, is sometimes seen as the first measure of liberalisation (Weulersse, 1910, vol. I, p. 32). However it does not deserve this evaluation (Depitre, 1910, pp. XXXVIII-XXXIX; Kaplan, 1976, Ch. III, section 1).
8
It should be noted that the Parliaments—the most important of which was that of Paris, whose jurisdiction was extremely wide—were Courts of Justice, and that positions were purchased.
9
For example, many rules and privileges, especially concerning the supply of food to towns, were not removed.
10
On the important question of the role of the Parliaments during this period see Egret (1970) and Kaplan (1976).
11
21 December 1769-Terray took the place of Étienne Maynon d’Invau (J. C. Ph. Trudaine de Montigny’s father-in-law) who himself replaced L’Averdy in 1768.
12
On all these events which marked the last two decades of the reign of Louis XV, see the classic study by G. Weulersse (1910, vol. I: book I, and vol. II: conclusions of book V) and the books by S. L. Kaplan (1976, 1984).
13
See Weulersse (1959, Ch. I). After Turgot’s nomination to the Contrôle général, and under the title Nouvelles éphémérides économiques, the journal was published again from December 1774 to March 1776 (Weulersse, 1950).
14
The bibliography on Galiani’s life and work is immense (see e.g. Guerci, 1975a) and of variable interest. As far as the problems dealt with here are concerned, the main works are to be found in the selected references at the end of this chapter. A summary of the knowledge to date on Galiani’s life can be found in Diaz (1975). Galiani’s correspondence is an essential complement to the study of his writings. Unfortunately, a reliable and complete edition of this correspondence does not yet exist: on this point, see for example Nicolini (1964), Bedarida (1975) and Guerci (1975c); Dulac and Maggetti are however currently publishing the letters exchanged between Galiani and Madame d’Épinay (see Galiani and d’Épinay, 1992-1997).
15
See Egret (1975) and Harris (1979); see also Grange (1974).
16
The book won the prize of the French Academy and thus greatly contributed to the intellectual and political fame of the author. Buffon, for example, publicly praised the Éloge, which somewhat irritated Galiani who claimed priority for his Dialogues as far as objections to the unlimited freedom of trade were concerned (see Galiani’s letter to Mme d’Épinay, 22 January 1774, in 1881, vol. II, p. 289).

-178-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in the History of French Political Economy: From Bodin to Walras
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 464

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.