Reformation Views of Church History

By Glanmor Williams | Go to book overview

V
AFTERMATH AND CONCLUSIONS

IT WAS NOT only in England that such Protestant history was enthusiastically pursued. In Wales, Scotland and Ireland, too, it had its exponents and its distinctive variations. The Welsh had a particularly keen appetite for early British history and a strong sense of the unique destiny of their own nation. Although their acceptance of reformed doctrine had in general been tardy and reluctant, there nevertheless existed a small group of Welshmen who were powerfully attracted by it. Humanists and Oxford graduates, steeped also in the literary and cultural heritage of Wales, they were prompted to re-examine the history of their own people in the light of their reformed convictions. The two key figures among them were Richard Davies, bishop of St. David's ( 1561-81) and an exile for religion in Mary's reign, and William Salesbury, the greatest Renaissance scholar produced in Wales. This pair's interest and expertise were well known to Parker and Cecil, with whom they exchanged a number of letters. The fullest exposition of their version of early British church history was given in Bishop Davies Address to the Welsh Nation with which he prefaced their translation of the New Testament, the first Welsh version, published in 1567.1

Davies based his account to a large extent on Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum. But it was Geoffrey with a difference. Far from emphasizing, as Geoffrey had done, the alleged temporal glory of the ancient British, Davies concentrated exclusively on their highest claim to distinction: their "uncorrupted religion". This they had first received from Joseph of Arimathea. Later, Eleutherius had helped by sending Fagan and Damian in response to King Lucius's appeal. After Lucius's time, Davies contended, the Britons held fast to their faith as they had first received it; this in the teeth of all the savage persecution which Diocletian and other pagan tyrants unloosed upon it and in spite of all the plausible wiles of Pelagians and other heretics. What ultimately proved to be the Britons' undoing was the consequences of Augustine's mission to the Anglo-Saxons. While the latter were still heathens the

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reformation Views of Church History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Contents 3
  • Ecumenical Studies in History 4
  • Preface 5
  • I - The Continental Background 7
  • II - The English Pioneer: William Tyndale 22
  • III - The Link: John Bale 33
  • IV - The Consummation: John Foxe 46
  • V - Aftermath and Conclusions 63
  • Bibliography 75
  • Notes 78
  • Index 82
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 85

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.